Boise CultureCulture

Treefort’s nonprofit row connects festival-goers to advocacy and civic engagement

Photo courtesy of Preston Valles

Nonprofit row is back at Treefort Music Festival this year with several organizations from the Boise area.

With Treefort 10 right around the corner, the festival is gearing up to host nonprofits like Planned Parenthood, Inclusive Idaho, the Wassmuth Center for Human Rights, CATCH, Speak Your Silence, Conservation Voters for Idaho, Vivid Roots Collective and Idaho Safety Crew.

Nonprofit row at Treefort is a place where many different non-profit organizations from around the Boise area come together in one place at the festival. All of the non-profits have tents and interact with the festival-goers. These organizations range anywhere from advocating for inclusivity to human rights to sustainability and more. 

Nonprofit row is an essential part of integrating the local Boise community into the festival, according to Celeste Giordani, the community engagement director at Treefort.

“Treefort Music Fest is committed to fostering positive community engagement in Idaho and beyond. We strive to create a space where attendees, artists, staff and passersby can connect with local, regional and national organizations to create access to advocacy,” Giordani said. 

Treefort sign
[Photo of a Treefort Music Fest sign.]
Photo courtesy of Preston Valles

With a large number of non-profit organizations in Boise, event managers have the difficult task of selecting which ones will be in attendance at the festival.

“As director of community engagement, I focus on partnering with organizations who are both interested in being present, and whose organizational work focuses on nurturing sustainable and intentional growth in the Treasure Valley. It is important to give space to both,” Giordani said. 

Hosting these organizations at the festival is pivotal for both parties’ successes. Treefort benefits from the community partnership because it allows attendees, artists and staff to find tangible routes to civic engagement. 

Nonprofits involved in the festival are able to connect with attendees in an engaging environment that highlights their mission, or a particular campaign they are promoting this spring. 

Organizations use the opportunity to present themselves at Treefort to meet various goals, including connecting with potential donors, volunteers and creating content that they can use for the rest of the year. 
“Nonprofit organizations are represented throughout the festival, but you can find most of them in the ‘Treefort for Good’ section outside of Main Stage on 12th Street,” Giordani said. “Stop by, learn more about their mission and get connected with the people and groups moving Idaho forward. Community engagement doesn’t stop at the row, as you can find organizations around the fest engaged with forts, artists and volunteering.”

Related posts
CultureReviews

Book Review: Is Colleen Hoover's latest novel "Reminders of Him" worth the read?

Trending bestselling author Colleen Hoover is known for her collection of romance novels that each…
Read more
CommentaryCulture

Commentary: Social media and influencer culture are changing the fashion industry

This article was written by Liv Clizbe, freshman Boise State student majoring in Digital Innovation…
Read more
CultureFilmReviews

Review: ‘Everything Everywhere All At Once’ is a must-see

When I came out of the theater after seeing “Everything Everywhere All At Once,” I practically…
Read more

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *