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There’s a Hooker in the kitchen: Vegan Lentil Soup

There are a lot of misconceptions surrounding vegetarianism and veganism; you won’t get the nutrients you need, you won’t get enough protein, you’re going to wither away…

PHOTO BY ROBBY MILO/THE ARBITER

ROBBY MILO/THE ARBITER

There are a lot of misconceptions surrounding vegetarianism and veganism; you won’t get the nutrients you need, you won’t get enough protein, you’re going to wither away…

However, these ideas aren’t true. As long as you’re a well-planned vegan or vegetarian, the incorporation of correct amounts of nutrients in your diet is a “piece of cake.” Vegetarians get a bad rap from pasta-tarians — those vegetarians who think that copious amounts of pasta equal a balanced, no-meat diet.

After soybeans and hemp, lentils are the third  highest plant-based protein. This soup is packed full of flavor and nutrients, and is cheap to boot. Find your lentils in the bulk section and you’ll save even more.

Ingredients:
5 cups vegetable broth (make sure not to get chicken or beef, as they have animal by-products in them)
1/2 onion, diced
2 large carrots, sliced
1 tsp. vegetable oil
1 tbsp. minced garlic
1 stalk celery, chopped
1 tbsp. lemon juice
2 tbsp. Italian seasonings
1 tbsp. parsley, chopped
2 bay leafs

1/2 cup yellow corn
1 tsp. dried thyme
1 tsp. salt
2 tsp. pepper
1 cup lentils
1 tbsp tomato paste

Directions:
1. Heat up the vegetable oil in a large soup pan. Sauté the garlic and onions for four minutes on medium heat, stirring occasionally. Add the carrots and celery, and saute for three minutes longer. Add the corn.
2. Mix in the vegetable broth, lentils, parsley, Italian seasonings, thyme, bay leaves and tomato paste. Bring to a boil, and then reduce heat. Simmer for 60 minutes, or until the lentils are tender (not mushy!).
3. Stir in lemon juice, salt and pepper. Remove the bay leaves, and serve.

Makes roughly 6 servings.

Face it; people eat some pretty funky stuff. But what about when they limit their diets and label them different things? What exactly is a “vegan” and how does it differ from a “vegetarian?” Restrictive diets aren’t just for tree-huggers — many people adopt them for ethical, political, religious and health related reasons.

Vegetarian: The most commonly known, vegetarianism is a diet that consists of everything but meat, and sometimes eggs. Some vegetarians also choose to abstain from by-products of animal slaughter, such as gelatin, whereas others don’t mind.

Ovo-vegetarian: This variety of vegetarianism includes eggs, but not dairy products. They’re not quite vegan, but a little bit more intense than just a vegetarian.

Lacto-vegetarian: This form allows dairy products, but excludes eggs.

Pescatarian: This form of vegetarianism includes fish and seafood, but does not include other types of meat. It also typically allows dairy and eggs. Often used as a transition to complete vegetarianism, or as a way to incorporate more protein.

Vegan: This form of eating eliminates all meat, dairy and animal by-products from the diet. It is restricted to vegetables, grains, fruits and nuts.

Raw vegan: A little bit stricter than regular veganism, raw vegans only consume raw foods; this means no cooking or processed foods allowed.

If you don’t feel up to cooking tonight, check out these vegan friendly restaurants!

About Lauren Hooker (0 Articles)
Lauren Hooker is the Marketing Director at Boise State Student Media. She is a senior Communication major with a certificate in Public Relations. She enjoys piña coladas and getting caught in the rain. Follow her on Twitter: @shesahooker.