News Main Feature

Stay up to date on campus news at arbiteronline.com. Catch Arbiter Minute broadcasts in the Student Union Building throughout the semester and online. New videos are released every Monday and Thursday throughout the semester.

Featuring Brandon Walton
Directed by Farzan Faramarzi
Edited by Farzan Faramarzi
© Boise State Student Media 2014

Stay up to date on campus news at arbiteronline.com. Catch Arbiter Minute broadcasts in the Student Union Building throughout the semester and online. New videos are released every Monday and Thursday throughout the semester.

Featuring Brandon Walton

Directed by Farzan Faramarzi

Edited by Farzan Faramarzi

© Boise State Student Media 2014

Stay up to date on campus news at arbiteronline.com.
Catch Arbiter Minute broadcasts in the Student Union Building throughout the semester and online. New videos are released every Monday and Thursday throughout the semester.
Featuring Brandon Walton 
Directed by Farzan Faramarzi
Edited by Farzan Faramarzi
© Boise State Student Media 2014 

Stay up to date on campus news at arbiteronline.com.
Catch Arbiter Minute broadcasts in the Student Union Building throughout the semester and online. New videos are released every Monday and Thursday throughout the semester.
Featuring Brandon Walton
Directed by Farzan Faramarzi
Edited by Farzan Faramarzi
© Boise State Student Media 2014

Stay up to date on campus news at arbiteronline.com.
Catch Arbiter Minute broadcasts in the Student Union Building throughout the semester and online. New videos are released every Monday and Thursday throughout the semester.
Featuring Brandon Walton
Directed by Farzan Faramarzi
Edited by Farzan Faramarzi
© Boise State Student Media 2014

By Alx Stickel and Nate Lowery

A man who was proclaiming the gospel of Jesus Christ was issued a citation and told to leave campus for being a disturbance and not cooperating with the dean of students this afternoon around 12:30 in the quad.

Chris Wuthrich, dean of students, is in charge of enforcing the policy for open space use, which the man was violating.  Wuthrich asked the preacher to talk to him about the policy. The preacher refused and asked Wuthrich to call the police.

“He was being disruptive, noisy, and we received complaints about the content of his message,” Wuthrich said. “The general nature of the disruption and the noisiness was the main concern, along with the gentleman’s unwillingness to talk to me about university policy.”

According to Wuthrich, being able to speak freely wherever you want is different than what is permitted by the open space use policy. The policy is enforced in the quad and area from the Hemingway Center to the Interactive Learning Center. Wuthrich said some students said they could hear the man in their classrooms.

Jeremy Conlon, a senior kinesiology major, said he was conversing with the preacher about Mormonism and Jesus Christ when Wuthrich approached them.

“We were having a great conversation when the dean of students came up and asked him (the preacher) to talk to him because he was being disruptive or blocking the pathway but (Wuthrich) didn’t show any ID or anything,” Conlon said. “[The preacher] said ‘I don’t have time to talk to you right now I’m in the middle of a message.”

The policy for open space use reads that Boise State is to remain a forum for a broad expression of views that are “not in conflict with the normal uses of the campus, rights of others and the limitations of lawful conduct.” The policy also states that the time, place and manner of free expression may be regulated to “prevent unreasonable interference or conflict with the educational, research, outreach or other legitimate functions of the university.”

Conlon said he thought Wuthrich and the police should not have asked the man to leave.

“I think it’s a joke,” Conlon said. “It is ridiculous, because he was not breaking any laws or rules, even if the campus policy says he needs to listen to authority from a Boise State faculty he did not present any verification that he was Boise State faculty and did not follow up with that either. That would be like me walking up to this guy here and saying, ‘Hey I don’t like the way you’re walking; get off of campus; I’m the dean of students. Leave right now you’re trespassing.”

Nathan Cook, a sophomore psychology major, agreed with Conlon’s sentiments. Cook said he was not offended by the message. Cook said the presentation of the message was very enthusiastic, and the preacher was just sharing his beliefs and wanting to help people out.

“I don’t think he should have been kicked out,” Cook said. “I don’t believe he was doing anything wrong. He was just expressing his views. I feel like if people were telling him he was blocking traffic, that they could have just moved. They didn’t have to resort to something like this, using full force to kick him out.”

Stay up to date on campus news at arbiteronline.com.
Catch Arbiter Minute broadcasts in the Student Union Building throughout the semester and online. New videos are released every Monday and Thursday throughout the semester.
Featuring Brandon Walton
Directed by Farzan Faramarzi
Edited by Farzan Faramarzi
© Boise State Student Media 2014 – 

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Although Boise was ranked by Liveability.com as one of the best places to live, history has shown that even the most beautiful places can be disgraced by a single incident of violence.

In light of the recent shooting tragedy in Santa Barbara in which six students were killed, Gene Deisinger, a behavior threat assessment, management specialist and clinical psychologist, was asked to speak about the nature and process of targeted violence in higher institutions at Boise State. Most of his speech  revolved around the difficulties of profiling.

“The human mind has evolved to profile,” Deisinger said. This can be misleading.

According to Deisinger, the mind does two things when first meeting another person: first, it categorizes the interaction based on past experience. Then, it assigns meaning, deciding whether or not the situation threatens the individuals well-being or survival.

“The good news is those heuristics work fairly well some of the time,” Deisinger said. “The bad news is they don’t work very well much of the time.”

In Deisinger’s opinion, many believe there has been an outbreak of mass shootings throughout the country. He stresses that this is not the case; shootings are much less frequent than other forms of violence.

He feels the majority of violence happens when people aren’t aware of it.

The number one problem over the years has been self-induced harm or violence in the home, where only one offender and one victim are involved. Mass shootings have been mostly associated with targeted violence, however.

Furthermore, most incidents occur at the victim’s home where they are alone and vulnerable. This, according to Deisinger, isn’t the perception most people have about targeted violence.

“In terms of violent crimes, most campuses are safe,” Deisinger said.

Even so, it helps to be aware.

Although it is impossible to profile someone who may potentially cause harm to others, there are signs to watch for. Deisinger uses the phrase “pathway to violence” to describe an individual’s actions leading up to an incident.

When an individual’s mood becomes drastically different than usual, Deisinger said that is when a person is most susceptible to hurting themselves or others.

“Oftentimes, it’s pretty clear the person’s state of crises,” he said.

Usually these people will express their ideas of violence to friends or co-workers. They will go beyond just thinking about harming others by mapping out the event.

“This doesn’t mean everyone who thinks about violence will do it,” Deisinger said. “These are usually people that someone has expressed their concerns about previously.”

In any instance in which a potentially violent situation may take place, Boise Police Department lieutenant Rob Gallas urges students and faculty to report what they see.  “I’d rather be inconvenienced and be wrong than have someone notice something and not report it,” Gallas said.

In his opinion, the Boise community is safe because people are willing to act.

“We’re not doing this alone,” Gallas said.

Most instances in which law enforcement officers catch someone in the act of a crime, he says, are when a bystander is paying attention and reports it.

In cases in which students are already on campus when an incident occurs, Gallas strongly recommends opting-in to Bronco Alert. This resource will either send you a text or email depending on preference if something serious takes place on campus. Students who want to opt-in can do so by clicking the link on their Bronco web home page. The entire sign-up process takes less than two minutes.

Gallas also recommends students and faculty take a more active approach by imagining their actions in these situations.

“If you’ve already thought it through, you’re going to respond that way,” Gallas said.

For additional information, go to http://emergencymanagement.boisestate.edu/emergency_procedures/.

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Mat Boesen, a red-shirt linebacker for Boise State’s football team, was arrested Thursday evening.

Boesen, 19, was charged with misdemeanor inattentive or careless driving and misdemeanor resisting or obstructing officers. He was booked in the jail at 7:41 p.m. but released later that same night.

The athletics department released a short statement saying they are aware of the situation and intend to follow the procedures outlined in the student conduct policy.

According to an article published by the Idaho Press Tribune Boesen is due in court on July 31.

Boesen, who red-shirted as a true freshman last year, was not expected to be a major contributor for the team this fall.

Bronco Stadium has a new name.

It will now be called Albertsons Stadium as both Boise State officials and Albertsons officials came to a long term agreement that sees Albertsons taking over the naming rights to the stadium.

Albertsons and Boise State’s deal is for 15 years and worth 12.5 million dollars.

This deal has been 17 years in the making as Boise State has been trying to sell off the naming rights to the stadium since 1997.

Albertsons now joins Taco Bell as the latest company to sponsor the university. Boise State and Taco Bell also came to a 15 year deal back in 2004.

This deal between Albertsons and Boise State seems to be the perfect fit as both institutions have been instrumental in the state of Idaho.

Albertsons was founded in Boise in 1939 and ever since has been a mainstay in the state and a vital part of the community. Last year the company moved its headquarters back to Boise after a seven year hiatus and felt this was a perfect way to make their return felt.

Read more here: http://www.idahostatesman.com/2014/05/21/3195133/its-albertsons-stadium.html?sp=/99/1687/&ihp=1#storylink=cpyAlbertson’s was founded right here Boise back in 1939 and ever since have been a mainstay in the state of Idaho. The company recently moved its corporate headquarters back to Idaho after a seven year hiatus.

“This is a 15-year deal,” Albertsons CEO Bob Miller said. “We bought the stores a year ago March. We’re anxious to let people know we’re here to stay; this is our corporate headquarters and it’s going to stay that way. And this is a good way to reinforce that message.”

Negotiations between Boise State and Albertsons began just a few months ago and it wasn’t long before the two parties came to an agreement.

Both Boise State and Albertsons are hoping this is a start of long term relationship with one another and are looking forward to working with each other.

Stay up to date on campus news at arbiteronline.com.
Catch Arbiter Minute broadcasts in the Student Union Building throughout the semester and online.
Featuring Katie Meikle and Brandon Walton
Directed by Farzan Faramarzi
Edited by Farzan Faramarzi
Max Chambers
© Boise State Student Media 2014

Article by Brandon Walton

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Boise State graduation parking will be free for all attendees. However, there are some limits. The following is an email distributed by Boise State University Transportation and Parking Services. The information pertains to Saturday, May 17, the day of the Boise State Commencement Ceremony.

Traffic Advisory

· University Drive/Taco Bell Arena – expect increased traffic congestion along University Drive, between Broadway Avenue and Capitol Boulevard, between 8:30 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. and between 5:00-7:30 p.m. for the 2014 Spring Commencement Ceremony, which starts at 10:00 a.m. and College of Western Idaho Commencement Ceremony which starts at 7:00 p.m.

Commencement Parking

· Parking is free all day. This includes all General and Reserved parking lots, pay lots and parking garages on campus.
· Arrive early, prior to 9:15 a.m. if attending the commencement ceremony to allow plenty of time to park and walk to the Taco Bell Arena. Doors open at 8:30 a.m.
· Accessible parking – the West Stadium parking lot, located between Taco Bell Arena and Bronco Stadium, will be reserved for accessible patrons and their families. Accessible parking is also available in the Lincoln Avenue Garage where an accessible-equipped shuttle will transport patrons to and from the Taco Bell Arena between 8:00 a.m.-2:00 p.m.
· Accessible-equipped shuttles will also be provided between the Lincoln Ave Garage and the Taco Bell Arena from 8:00 a.m.-2:00 p.m.

Click here to view a map of parking available for the Boise State Commencement.

Restricted Parking:

The West Stadium Lot, located between Taco Bell Arena and Bronco Stadium, will be reserved for accessible patrons and their families as well as special groups assisting with Commencement.

 

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When Jake Wolford, president of Secular Student Alliance, first came up with the religion of the shoe: he was attempting to save people’s “soles” and “heels” them from their sin.

Wolford created his “religion” as a response to the religious bigotry being shouted in the Quad throughout dead week.

“We were both preaching nonsense, but only one of us was aware of it,” Wolford said.

Students passing through the Quad felt strongly about the matter.

“It’s one thing to preach a loving message,” said Kyle Van Arsdale, spectator at the scene. “There’s nothing good about what they have to say.”

Brother Jed, who many students have come to know well already, visited campus during dead week spreading his message of salvation through bigotry. The first day of his arrival students stood by shocked at the details in which he told his hateful stories. His antics managed to draw a crowd by the end of the day. However, the crowd did not just consist of students. Police and Fox Channel 6 News were present as well.

The second day students came prepared. By noon Wednesday, a crowd yet again gathered around Brother Jed, this time many students sat with a bigot bingo card placed in front of them. The inspiration for the card came from the topics he discussed the previous day.

“Jesus will deliver you from your sins,” Brother Jed said.

A call from the crowd let everyone know someone’s gotten bingo.  

Later on in the afternoon, students gathered around singing “kumbaya” to spread peace to students as they pass between classes.

“I think the best thing you can do is just make fun of it,” Wolford said.

Wednesday night Brother Jed allegedly struck a student attempting to give him a hug, which a member of The Arbiter, Farzan Faramarzi, caught on tape. On Thursday students arrived early in anticipation of the next day’s events.

“Some people are just curious,” said Lee Rever, a junior at Boise State. “They wanna see what’s going on or what’s going to happen next.”

There’s no question that the presence of Brother Jed and his fellow pastors served as both a source of entertainment and frustration for many students walking through the Quad this past week. For others, it gave them a chance to be ridiculous.

“It’s like they’re giving me a free pass to go H.A.M.,” Wolford said. “Anything I do won’t look as idiotic compared to them.”

He believes that what the pastors had to say was nonsense and wanted everyone else passing to realize this as well.

“My idea was that if I was openly making a fool of myself in the name of religion, people could realize that the pastors were doing the same thing,”
Wolford said.

Pro Life Demonstration Devin Ferrell
Abolishionists4Life, a Boise State Club, hosted a demonstration on the quad in partnership with the Campus Outreach for Survivors of the Abortion Holocaust to protest abortion practices. Students from the Secular Student Alliance joined in a counter-demonstration. Devin Ferrell

Updated 5/2/2014

Students walking through the Quad were bombarded by pro-life and pro-choice activists. Images of aborted fetuses littered the walkway. In the midst of this chaos, sorority girls were handing out coupons for free tacos. This is the epitome of a college campus.

Campus Outreach for the Survivors of the Abortion Holocaust, a national pro-life group, and Abolitionists for Life, a campus pro-life club,   hosted the protest which inspired some and left others disgusted.

“It’s good to have an open dialogue,” said Lisa Atkins, president of Abolitionists for Life. “If this is happening legally every day then we should be able to talk about it.”

Students walking by the Quad could hardly pass through the gauntlet of photos without catching a glimpse of one of the large poster-sized images depicting the fetus in its aborted form. Many felt strongly toward these graphic images believing they weren’t suitable for the campus
environment.

“This is gross,” said Jake Wolford, president of Boise State’s Secular Student Alliance (SSA). “Is this even OK, to display
on campus?”

The pro-life group organizing the event believe these images are appropriate and need to be seen.

Christina Garza, director for campus outreach for Survivors, explained the group’s position toward the photos.

“We’re allowing the victims to speak for themselves,” Garza said. “It would be an injustice on our part if we let these victims die silently without anyone to defend them.”

Through talking to passersby, they found that many people will not take a stance on the issue.

“We would like students to choose one side or the other,” Garza said. “It’s not safe to stay in the middle because innocent lives are being killed.”

Protesters from the Secular Student Alliance believe either way, women who think abortion is right are going to use this method.

“I think people should have the right to abortion in any circumstance,” Wolford said.

He believes it is the right of every human being to choose their stance on this issue and having access to programs that provide education and aboritions will decrease abortion rates and complications from unhealthy alternatives.

For Garza, the question isn’t when is it OK, but whether the act of abortion is killing another human being.

“We should protect that human being,” Garza said. “Not look for situations where killing that person is justified.”

Wolford also feels the pro-life event is based on religious beliefs, which is something the club feels is inaccurate.

“We’re not here because it’s a religious issue but because it’s a human rights issue,”
Atkins said.

According to abortion statistics, approximately 1.06 million abortions took place in the U.S. in 2011.

“If we can save one life by changing someone’s mind about abortion,” Garza said. “Then all of this is worth it.”

On April 28, when the Secular Student Alliance and Campus Outreach for the Survivors of the Abortion Holocaust were protesting, the Boise State University Student Foundation was holding an appreciation event for people who donated money to Boise State. They had placed flags on the quad, each flag representing 25 donations to the university.

According to club president, Katlin Bailey, there were 2,212 flags.

The original article reported these flags stood for the number of fetuses aborted ever day. This was incorrect, the two events had no correlation.