Main Feature

Stay up to date on campus news at arbiteronline.com.
Catch Arbiter Minute broadcasts in the Student Union Building throughout the semester and online. New videos are released every Monday and Thursday throughout the semester.
Featuring Brandon Walton
Directed by Farzan Faramarzi
Edited by Farzan Faramarzi
© Boise State Student Media 2014

Stay up to date on campus news at arbiteronline.com.
Catch Arbiter Minute broadcasts in the Student Union Building throughout the semester and online. New videos are released every Monday and Thursday throughout the semester.
Featuring Brandon Walton
Directed by Farzan Faramarzi
Edited by Farzan Faramarzi
© Boise State Student Media 2014

Boise State students Ty Hawkins and Brandon Walton recap the Mountain West Championship game.

Stay up to date on campus news at arbiteronline.com.
Catch Arbiter Minute broadcasts in the Student Union Building throughout the semester and online. New videos are released every Monday and Thursday throughout the semester.
Featuring Brandon Walton, Ty Hawkins
Directed by Farzan Faramarzi
Edited by Farzan Faramarzi
© Boise State Student Media 2014

With the MW Championship game only a day away, players and coaches from both Boise State and Fresno State talk about what this game means to them.

Stay up to date on campus news at arbiteronline.com.
Catch Arbiter Minute broadcasts in the Student Union Building throughout the semester and online. New videos are released every Monday and Thursday throughout the semester.
Featuring Brandon Walton
Directed by Farzan Faramarzi
Edited by Farzan Faramarzi
© Boise State Student Media 2014

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Gifts

1. For the sweet tooth: Cookies in a tube 

Make a conveniently mail-able and deliciously snack-able gift using a mailing tube and a little gift wrap. Wrap the tube in a sheet of colorful wrapping paper. Make a batch of cookies (we recommend chewy ginger spice snaps—view this article online for the full recipe). Let the cookies cool completely. Then, wrap in bright tissue paper and insert inside the tube.

This is a great gift for foodie friends and family, near or far; postmark the tube itself for easy mailing or gift as is.

Chewy ginger spice cookies (adapted from allrecipes.com):

Ingredients: 

  • 2 1/2 c flour
  • 2 tsp ginger
  • 1 tsp baking soda
  • 1 tsp cinnamon
  • 1/2 tsp ground cloves
  • 1/2 tsp nutmeg
  • 1/4 tsp salt
  • 3/4 c butter at room temperature
  • 1 c and 1/4 c white sugar
  • 1 egg
  • 1/4 c molasses

Directions:

  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.
  2. Stir dry ingredients together in a bowl.
  3. Mix butter and 1 c sugar together with a hand mixer; add egg and molasses. Gradually add dry ingredients.
  4. Shape dough into rounded teaspoon-sized balls and roll in remaining sugar. (Make sure the cookie balls are not so large that they will be too big for the mailing tube once baked!)
  5. Place cookies on greased cookie sheets and flatten slightly; bake for about five minutes, or until just done.
  6. Serve with milk or a scrumptious glass of eggnog. Ho ho ho.

2. For the boozie: Mulled wine sachet

Be the toast of the party with this libation: Take a square piece of cheesecloth (find this at any grocery store) and wrap up a cinnamon stick, 1 tbsp of whole cloves, 2 star anise, 1 tbsp allspice berries, 2 tbsp turbinado sugar (just brown sugar with large crystals), and the peel of one orange (sliced thin). You can find most of these items in the  spice aisle of a grocery store. Tie the sachet with kitchen twine. Gift the sachet with a bottle of red wine and a decorated note for instructions. For full instructions on how to prepare the mulled wine, visit this article online at arbiteronline.com.

Directions: 

  1. Submerge sachet in a bottle of red wine in a large pot over low heat for forty-five minutes. Make sure that the sachet is tied tightly; you want the wine to absorb the flavors of the spices, not for the spices to go swimming.
  2. Once nice and warm, serve in goblets and make merry.

Decorations 

Is it really the holidays without a few decorations? However all that shine and shimmer can really break the bank for college students on a budget. Here are a couple ways to cut corners without giving up all that glam.

1. Use wrapping paper

Any college student worth their salt knows the old “wrap your door” trick. However, beyond that, wrapping paper is largely underused as a decorating item. Literal yards of the stuff can be acquired for a few dollars in prints that range from upscale holiday to Labrador puppies in hats.

Wrap up whatever you can find and pile them in a corner. (Or you could just get all that shopping and wrapping done early. Make all those presents you have to haul home work for you. Two birds, one stone, all that.)

For a twist on wrapping your door, make individual “presents” for all your roommates and label them with a gift tag. Or with just a few sheets of construction paper turn your door into a reindeer, snowman or Santa as appropriate.

2. Ornament Garland

While this project will cost you more than a bundle of wrapping paper it is worth it. It provides a statement piece that, if stored properly, can be used again next year. All you need is some sturdy ribbon or string and a bunch of traditional ball ornaments. Ornaments are available at nearly every dollar store. Or, if it will break the bank this year, wait until after Christmas. Stores will clearance unpurchased ornaments and they can be picked up for spare change.

Once you have the necessary items, all you have to do is assemble. Tie a loop at the end of your ribbon so you’ll have some way to hang your garland. Then string and knot the first ornament. After that it’s just a matter of adding ornaments until you’ve reached the desired length. Be sure to knot the last ornament and tie another loop at the end.

Boise State students Ty Hawkins and Brandon Walton recap the Boise State Utah State game.

Stay up to date on campus news at arbiteronline.com.
Catch Arbiter Minute broadcasts in the Student Union Building throughout the semester and online. New videos are released every Monday and Thursday throughout the semester.
Featuring Brandon Walton, Ty Hawkins
Directed by Farzan Faramarzi
Edited by Farzan Faramarzi
© Boise State Student Media 2014

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Beards make their place as part of main stream culture

By: Patricia Bowen

Side burns, mutton chops, the Fu Manchu, Goatees: just a few of the many hairstyles that may grace the faces of Boise State students.

Over the last decade, beards have gone from a husky man’s game to a main stream trend.

“I think (beards are) more socially acceptable. It used to be a sign of skuzziness or grunginess, and now it is kind of cool to have a beard,” said Nate Willacy, freshman finance and accounting double major.

Willacy feels that the facial hair trend has become more popular because of its prevalence in pop culture and sports.

“A lot of famous celebrities, musicians and athletes have beards. People typically follow the people that they like,” Willacy said. “It also makes people look older.”

James Harden, an NBA player for the Houston Rockets, was cited by Willacy as an athlete who is currently rocking the beard. The increasing number of celebrities with beards has created an avenue for men to have facial hair without being socially outcast.

“I don’t think beards are (part of a subculture) anymore,” said Abby Filicetti, sophomore health science major.

Filicetti explained that the beard has escalated to something that anyone can sport without being discriminated against based on appearance.

“I definitely feel as millennials age there will be more beard in the workplace,” Willacy said. “My previous job didn’t want me to have a beard but when I got my current job, they were completely fine with it so I see the trend already happening.”

Willacy feels that the beard, like the tattoo, has made its place in the millennial’s wardrobe and with time will become more and more prominent and socially acceptable.

“The world’s changing and all sorts of things are changing for the better,” Willacy said. “People’s appearances most of the time, I feel, are not a big deal anymore.”

Is No Shave November also for women?

By: Zoey Nguyen

No Shave November’s or Movember’s initial purpose was to raise awareness on men’s health issues such as prostate cancer. Nowadays, it is almost an automatic tradition amongst some males.

As November has arrived, a definite part of the male population has decided to participate in No Shave November, letting their hair grow free for the whole month.

So while the males are throwing away their razor blades and are happily growing out their beards and moustaches (whichever is in their ability to do), the female population of campus isn’t afraid to get in on the fun.

While most females say that, personally, it is not something they are interested in, they definitely think No Shave November should not be confined to just one gender.

“I think females participate in No Shave November if they want to make a statement that it isn’t a gender specific thing and that it shouldn’t be limited to one gender and that shaving is annoying and takes a lot of time, but it’s definitely something that more attracts males,” said Marissa Hondros, a junior majoring in biology.

And although most females do not plan to be a part of  the No Shave November tradition,  most support the women who do, saying that their decision on what they do with their own bodies should not be judged.

“Why should men be the only ones who don’t have to shave? It’s completely unnatural for anyone to shave, but we do it because society pressures us into it,” said Amelia Keily, sophomore in social work. “I encourage people to do whatever they like.”

Ask the Beard

By: Justin Doering

Kyle Bosher, junior business major:

My reason: “No Shave November is something to do with friends, we usually compete to see who can grow the most impressive beard. The only issue is that I have to keep it somewhat trimmed for work so I can’t be as manly as I would like to be.”

People think: “I like to think with a good beard I’m seen as someone who can take care of things, like I manage a large business or play sports.”

Kolby Kennedy, freshman construction

management major:

My reason: “I want to make my father proud! He doesn’t really support me all that much when it comes to facial hair, so I’d like to think a good strong beard for the break will be a good enough reason for my dad to let me cut the turkey.”

By the end of it: “Right now I look kind of like a homeless Michael Cera, but hopefully by the end of it I’ll look like that mountain man from Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer.”

Matt Ammons, junior economics major:

My reason: “I usually have a beard, this just gives me of an excuse. I usually go hard for No Shave November and let the neck beard go wild all the way through Christmas break. My parents are never too fond of it and I think they are starting to think I just live on the streets.”

By the end of it: “Ideally, I will look a young, more successful Dan Blizerian. Hopefully people don’t just think I’m trashy and know that this thing is for No Shave November.”

Boise State students Ty Hawkins and Brandon Walton recap the Boise State San Diego State game.

Stay up to date on campus news at arbiteronline.com.
Catch Arbiter Minute broadcasts in the Student Union Building throughout the semester and online. New videos are released every Monday and Thursday throughout the semester.
Featuring Brandon Walton, Ty Hawkins
Directed by Farzan Faramarzi
Edited by Farzan Faramarzi
© Boise State Student Media 2014

Stay up to date on campus news at arbiteronline.com.
Catch Arbiter Minute broadcasts in the Student Union Building throughout the semester and online. New videos are released every Monday and Thursday throughout the semester.
Featuring Brandon Walton
Directed by Farzan Faramarzi
Edited by Farzan Faramarzi
© Boise State Student Media 2014

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Kyle Brotzman didn't let that night in Reno define who he was.

He holds the record for most points ever scored by a Boise State football player. If you heard his name, however, the only thing you’d remember is one fateful night which changed his life.

Nov. 26, 2010, No. 4  Boise State was taking on the Nevada Wolfpack in Reno, Nevada. The Broncos were just a few wins away from playing in their third BCS bowl game in five years and had aspirations for playing in a national championship-until the unthinkable happened: Kyle Brotzman missed two field goals and the Boise State Broncos saw their BCS hopes shattered and their 24- game winning streak broken.

“It was gut-wrenching and heartbreaking,” Brotzman said.

No matter how many records he broke, Brotzman’s legacy began here.

“He could always put things away and shove them away,” father Hank Brotzman said. “This one, though, has bothered him for a long time and has kept on coming back at him more than what I even realized.”

Shortly after the game,  Brotzman and his family received harassing phone calls and Facebook messages threatening his life.

“It was easy for those people to say all that stuff behind his back,” older brother Michael Brotzman said. “It’s easy for people to say stuff over the phone or online and I bet they wouldn’t have said it to his face.”

According to his mother Julie Brotzman, he still gets emails at least once a month in relation to the field goals.

Brotzman’s career has been much more than missed field goals, however. He was the hero in the 2010 Fiesta Bowl in which he threw a pass on a fake punt which set up a game-winning touchdown. He also ranks second in NCAA history for points scored with 439 points.

“People forget about all of his achievements because of those kicks,” Julie Brotzman said. “He still holds several records but people forget about all of those.”

Had the kicks gone in, Brotzman feels his career might have been different.

“I’ve thought about that for almost four years now and I still don’t know,” Brotzman said. “If it would have gone in then maybe things would have been different and I would have gotten workouts with NFL teams. That isn’t for me to say, though.”

Despite everything that he had to endure, he hasn’t let the events of that night define who he is.

Since then, Brotzman has gone on to play in the Arena Football League and hopes to play in the Canadian Football League one day.

“I am still the same person I always was and can still play,” Brotzman said. “That event didn’t define what my career was here; it made me a better person in the long run. Two kicks don’t define me.”

Brotzman just recently moved back to Boise from Utah and is waiting to see what his future in football may hold.

In the meantime though he is working over at Costco and if things don’t work out with football he would like to become a firefighter or become involved in helping kids deal with bullying.

“I can go out in public and I hear, ‘we love you’,” Brotzman said. “At my work when someone recognizes who I am, they shake my hand and don’t have a bad thing to say.”

Despite everything that’s happened, he still has a special place in his heart for Boise State University.

“I still have love for Bronco nation and I had just such a great time here,” Brotzman said. “You can’t change that.”

For Brotzman, the future does indeed look bright and the legacy he left at Boise State was far greater than that night in Reno.

“What’s next for Kyle Brotzman is whatever he decides on,” younger brother Bryon Brotzman said.

Boise State students Ty Hawkins and Brandon Walton recap the Boise State New Mexico game.

Stay up to date on campus news at arbiteronline.com.
Catch Arbiter Minute broadcasts in the Student Union Building throughout the semester and online. New videos are released every Monday and Thursday throughout the semester.
Featuring Brandon Walton, Ty Hawkins
Directed by Farzan Faramarzi
Edited by Farzan Faramarzi
© Boise State Student Media 2014