Main Feature

Stay up to date on campus news at arbiteronline.com.
Catch Arbiter Minute broadcasts in the Student Union Building throughout the semester and online.
New videos are released every Monday and Thursday throughout the semester.
Featuring Brandon Walton
Directed by Farzan Faramarzi
Edited by Holly Hovis
© Boise State Student Media 2015

Stay up to date on campus news at arbiteronline.com.
Catch Arbiter Minute broadcasts in the Student Union Building throughout the semester and online.
New videos are released every Monday and Thursday throughout the semester.
Featuring Ty Hawkins
Directed by Farzan Faramarzi
Edited by Farzan Faramarzi
© Boise State Student Media 2015

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We interviewed director of the program Dave Fotsch, he gives a detailed explanation into how the program works and operates, and what all is needed to rent a bicycle. By Earth Day, Wednesday, April 22 2015 the public will have access to all 114 bikes available through the bikeshare program.

CREDITS:
Tyler Wilson-Producer/Editor
Cody Sullivan-Producer/Editor
Dave Fotsch-Director of Boise GreenBike

Stay up to date on campus news at arbiteronline.com.
Catch Arbiter Minute broadcasts in the Student Union Building throughout the semester and online.
New videos are released every Monday and Thursday throughout the semester.
© Boise State Student Media 2015

 

Stay up to date on campus news at arbiteronline.com.
Catch Arbiter Minute broadcasts in the Student Union Building throughout the semester and online.
New videos are released every Monday and Thursday throughout the semester.
Featuring Brandon Walton
Directed by Farzan Faramarzi
Edited by Farzan Faramarzi
© Boise State Student Media 2015

Stay up to date on campus news at arbiteronline.com.
Catch Arbiter Minute broadcasts in the Student Union Building throughout the semester and online.
New videos are released every Monday and Thursday throughout the semester.
Featuring Brandon Walton
Directed by Farzan Faramarzi
Edited by Farzan Faramarzi
© Boise State Student Media 2015

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Tyler Paget
Freshman forward Chandler Hutchison (No. 15) would not be able to play this season if a proposed NCAA amendment making freshman ineligible for varsity sports passes.

American culture is dominated by sports.

From some the earliest years, many American’s are placed in sports. Data from polls conducted by ESPN in 2013 says over 21.5 million children ages 6 to 17 participate in sports.

27% of American adults spent 6-10 hours a week watching the NFL according to the Harris Poll. According to the Fantasy Sports Trade Association, over 32 million Americans spent $15 billion on fantasy sports as well as 8.67 hours a week consuming fantasy sports.

Even when their playing days are over, many Americans trudge out onto a frozen field for the annual turkey bowl.

For the majority of Americans, the rite of passage is paved with sports.

Our obsession with sports and the role they play in society can be narrowed down to four main pillars gathered from interviews with seven Boise State athletes and coaches.:

1. Sports teaches life skills

2. Sports teaches character

3. Sports provides a family

4. Sports provides an emotional escape

Life Skills

Of the seven Boise State athletes and coaches interviewed for this story, five said that they have applied skills they have learned from sports in their everyday lives.

“I think after someone gets out of sports its role in society would be the skills it gives you—time management, dedication and determination,” gymnastics junior Maddie Krentz said. “Those things will lead to somebody in the workforce or wherever going better because of what they learned in sports.”

Assistant women’s soccer coach Maite Zabala said that sports has been used on an international level to empower individuals, particuarly women.

“Sports in general (are) pretty empowering when you take a chance to learn something and work as a team,” Zabala said. “If you empower women, and a lot of times they talk about doing that through sports, more empowering of women equals much more developed and stable societies.”

Character

Sports has provided countless situations to teach an individual lessons of character.

Zabala believes that sports primarily reveals one’s character, but the most important aspect is it offers a lesson on ethics.

“I think that people’s character can be exposed in difficult times,” Zabala said. “Difficult times can also allow someone to step up and learn how to do things the right way. I think it’s a little bit of both.”

Junior punter Sean Wale agrees that sports has provided countless role models throughout his life. Wale argues this is a double-edged sword, however.

“It builds that character that is needed throughout life and a lot of athletes are really looked up to. I don’t know if that’s how it should be,” Wale said. “I know where I was from, there would be people who grew up not playing sports and they’d kind of get into more trouble.”

Family

The case of Antoine Turner provided the perfect narrative of sports providing an individual with a basic human need—stability.

Turner was homeless until Boise State was able to offer him financial assistance following an NCAA waiver.

“My team just means family,” redshirt junior offensive lineman Steven Baggett said. “We’re all just trying to get better each day and every day.”

Head cross country and track and field coach Corey Ihmels added that he has been shaped by those he has competed with.

“I think (sports) shapes who you are,” Ihmels said. “The people that you meet and the ones that you are around, they shape who you are and the path that you go down. I’m not doing what I’m doing today without quite a few people (I’ve met from sports).”

Emotional Escape

Distance runner Marisa Howard loves sports because of the unscripted moments. Anything can happen on any given day.

From the 1980 Miracle on Ice, to one-legged Anthony Robles winning an NCAA wrestling title or the success of Boston sports in the wake of the Boston Marathon bombing, sports has provided an escape for our society.

“I feel like it’s such a raw form of entertainment,” Howard said. “We always talk about just those amazing moments that you can’t script and how much pure joy winning a championship or making that goal—you can’t script that stuff.”

Krentz added that her career in gymnastics has provided her an escape from the trials and tribulations of life.

“One of my friends earlier this year said this perfectly, ‘Gymnastics is our church,’” Krentz said. “It’s where we go for everything and it’s always super helpful. It’s like our own little getaway.”

Stay up to date on campus news at arbiteronline.com.
Catch Arbiter Minute broadcasts in the Student Union Building throughout the semester and online.
New videos are released every Monday and Thursday throughout the semester.
Featuring Chaise Goris
Directed by Farzan Faramarzi
Edited by Holly Hovis
© Boise State Student Media 2015

Stay up to date on campus news at arbiteronline.com.
Catch Arbiter Minute broadcasts in the Student Union Building throughout the semester and online.
New videos are released every Monday and Thursday throughout the semester.
Featuring Ty Hawkins
Directed by Farzan Faramarzi
Edited by Farzan Faramarzi
© Boise State Student Media 2015

Stay up to date on campus news at arbiteronline.com.
Catch Arbiter Minute broadcasts in the Student Union Building throughout the semester and online.
New videos are released every Monday and Thursday throughout the semester.
Featuring Brandon Walton
Directed by Farzan Faramarzi
Edited by Holly Hovis
© Boise State Student Media 2015

Stay up to date on campus news at arbiteronline.com.
Catch Arbiter Minute broadcasts in the Student Union Building throughout the semester and online.
New videos are released every Monday and Thursday throughout the semester.
Featuring Ty Hawkins
Directed by Farzan Faramarzi
Edited by Farzan Faramarzi
© Boise State Student Media 2015

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The meet wasn’t for the championship. There was no title on the line, no singular glory to be achieved.

For two lifetime gymnasts, it should have been another regular season home match-up. But for Ann Stockwell and Krystine Jacobsen, the Feb. 27 meet against BYU was the most important of their lives.

That night, the Boise State gymnastics team honored both Stockwell and Jacobsen’s mothers before the meet. They honored their battle with breast cancer by having the entire team and the audience dressed in pink to honor those affected by breast cancer.

The meet served as the culmination of their efforts to succeed, despite their mothers’ struggles.

Stockwell’s story

In June 2014, freshman Ann Stockwell was getting ready for one of the biggest moments of her life­—her high school graduation. Then it happened. Her mom, Mary Stockwell, was diagnosed with stage two breast cancer.

“I never thought it would be my mom,” Stockwell said. “You always hear the stories about other people.”

A native of Newcastle, California, Stockwell was set to leave for Boise State where she had been offered a scholarship.

Suddenly she wasn’t so sure of her future.

“I felt alone and was doubting everything,” Stockwell said. “I had to take some time by myself to just process
it all.”

With her mom’s encouragement, Stockwell left for Boise State to pursue her dream of competing in collegiate gymnastics.

The decision proved to be a difficult one, and Stockwell struggled with her choice.

Help arrives

When Stockwell reached out for support from her fellow teammates, junior Krystine Jacobsen emerged.

“To have her there for me like that made it so much easier for me to deal with everything I was going through,” Stockwell said.

As the months went by and the season got underway, their friendship continued to improve—as did Stockwell’s mother. Mary had undergone successful chemotherapy and surgery.

Stockwell and Jacobsen were both having tremendous seasons and aided in helping their team vault to No. 12 in the nation.

However, the period of good fortune was about to end.

Jacobsen’s story

In February 2015, Jacobsen got the devastating news that her mom, Judy Jacobsen, had also been diagnosed with breast cancer.

“My mom found out a week before I knew and didn’t tell me because she knew I had a meet coming up,” Jacobsen said. “I was wondering, ‘How far along is she?’ and ‘Is she going to be OK?’ Tears started running down my face because I started thinking about life without my mom.”

Just like Stockwell eight months before, Jacobsen was faced with a decision.

“When I found out, there was a lot of uncertainty for me and I had that doubt creep in,” Jacobsen said. “My first thought was I wanted to go home and support her.”

In the end she decided the team was where she needed to be.

“This is what my mom wants for me. She wants me here with my team because she knows this is what I want to do,” Jacobsen said. “After all of that you turn around and you realize this could be worse than what it is. You learn to fight through it and move on.”

Going beyond
friendship

Stockwell, upon learning the news, was there for Jacobsen every step of the way.

“I told her my viewpoint and my experiences of what I had gone through,” Stockwell said. “I wish I would have had someone who had gone through something like this when it happened to me. I wanted to make sure that she had that from me.”

The two of them talk every day and have formed a lifelong friendship.

“We want to make the other aware that they are always on our mind,” Jacobsen said. “That is the best part to have someone there for you anytime and completely understands what you are going through.”

Outlook

Stockwell’s mother is continuing treatment in Boise, where she moved to be closer to her daughter. The results are promising.

Jacobsen’s mother had a double mastectomy and reconstructive surgery on March 23 in Virginia, where she lives. She received news that the cancer is not in her lymph nodes and is already off pain medication.

While both remain optimistic, Jacobsen and Stockwell contend daily with the lingering fear.

“There is always that small chance that it could come back and that scares me to death,” Stockwell said. “I would hate for her to have to go through all of this all over again.”

Both Stockwell and Jacobsen have learned not to dwell on what they can’t control.

“I have just taken all of this day by day,” Jacobsen said. “I have had to push through every emotion but I am here today and have come so far.”

February 27

On the night their mothers were honored Jacobsen posted a score of 9.875 on the uneven bars, the second highest of her career, and led the team on the balance beam with a 9.875, which tied her career high.

Stockwell posted a career best 9.925 on vault.

“Everything that I have pushed through and all the hard work that I have put in finally fell into place,” Stockwell said. “It was just the perfect performance to have for my mom and my team.”

Moving forward

On March 21 Stockwell and Jacobsen helped the Broncos win the Mountain Rim Conference championship for the first time in school history.

Jacobsen earned All-MRGC first team in uneven bars and second team in balance beam. Stockwell earned All-MRGC first team vault.

“They are both so inspiring,” co-head coach Tina Bird said. “They are carrying the load that every other kid is carrying as a student-athlete but have the burden of these family issues on them. For them not to crack but to be amazing at every meet is incredible.”

The duo, along with the rest of the team, are now preparing for the NCAA Regionals which take place on April 4. The two are hoping to help the team make history by qualifying for the NCAA Nationals for the first time in program history.

“It would be incredibly overwhelming if it happened,” Stockwell said. “To go from the worst day of my life to the best day of my life would be amazing. It would make all that hard work and emotional struggles worth it.”

Whatever happens, Stockwell and Jacobsen know they can get through anything and are much stronger than ever before.

“I have learned through all of this that nothing can hold you back if you just follow your heart and push through everything that may come your way,” Jacobsen said.

Stay up to date on campus news at arbiteronline.com.
Catch Arbiter Minute broadcasts in the Student Union Building throughout the semester and online.
New videos are released every Monday and Thursday throughout the semester.
Featuring Chaise Goris
Directed by Farzan Faramarzi
Edited by Holly Hovis
© Boise State Student Media 2015

Stay up to date on campus news at arbiteronline.com.
Catch Arbiter Minute broadcasts in the Student Union Building throughout the semester and online.
New videos are released every Monday and Thursday throughout the semester.
Featuring Ty Hawkins
Directed by Farzan Faramarzi
Edited by Farzan Faramarzi
© Boise State Student Media 2015

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Justin Kirkham, managing editor
Alx Stickel, news editor

In the middle of program cuts and department closures, other areas of the university are expanding—including the College of Innovation and Design.  Anthony Ellertson, the current head of the Gaming, Interactive Media and Mobile Program, aims to offer a unique major at Boise State—one he hopes will be profitable in terms of employment.

“We have to think about the return on investment, which is where our program fits in,” Ellertson said.  “We are committed to staying on the leading edge of software development for interactive media.”

Individual employability

The GIMM program, a four-year transdisciplinary major, will offer students multiple special courses including those on animation, app and web development, augmented reality and virtual reality.  This fall, interactive programming and digital tools classes will be available to students.

Ellertson stressed that this sort of instruction is vital in the current technological landscape of Boise.  Students in the program will be prepared specifically for jobs in this changing field, a main focus of the College of Innovation and Design as a whole.

The College of Innovation and Design aims to fill this role, just as other STEM programs.

“It’s not just that we did it so that people could make big money, but that they could make money here in Boise,” Bob Kustra, president of Boise State, told The Arbiter in February. “When you take Micron, HP and somewhere in the neighborhood of 80 software engineering firms who cry crocodile tears that we are not producing enough computer science engineers—clearly you don’t need to be a rocket scientist to see that’s where you need to be churning out students.”

According to Kustra, these programs should be unique to Boise State.  Students will not come specifically to the university for a program that they can enroll in elsewhere.  Instead, focused and applicable programs can attract more students while “churning out” specialized employees.

Ellertson said GIMM students will become specialized for many of the top demand IT jobs in the current field: mobile, web and game development.

Marketing the arts and humanities

For some, this sort of high specialization is not as good as it may sound.

Leslie Madsen-Brooks, associate professor in the recently resized Department of History, does not disapprove of the College of Innovation of Design.  But, like others, she has her reservations about growth surrounding the cuts in her own department.  She cited an article from IEEE Spectrum, “The STEM Crisis is a Myth,” that recounts the overemphasis on employment-oriented STEM programs.

“There are far more people graduating with STEM degrees than there are jobs for them,” Madsen-Brooks said.  “We aren’t giving them magic employment juice.”

Dean of the College of Innovation and Design Gordon Jones said he’s excited about the opportunity to lead the college in addressing the need for a more transdisciplinary experience.

“I think a lot of universities are recognizing that academic specialization is putting up walls or barriers between departments  that make it more difficult for interdisciplinary collaboration to occur,” Jones said. “And that requires faculty to be even more intentional if we are going to collaborate. “

Madsen-Brooks explained that students should, instead of honing in on job capabilities, focus on gaining pertinent skills for a range of possible employment opportunities, including research, writing, critical thinking and group work.  These are the main aims of the Department of History within its coursework.

“You still have to certify that STEM majors can write and communicate,” Madsen-Brooks said.  “That’s where the humanities and social sciences come in.”

According to Madsen-Brooks, the College of Innovation and Design is a solid collection of programs, but she sees some overlap within its coursework.  Specifically, the proposed Center for Human-Environment Systems offers students similar explorations that the Department of History already covers.

Madsen-Brooks hopes that the core programs of the humanities will still be able to market themselves as important programs with these new developments.

A transdisciplinary movement

The GIMM major is a 48-credit, transdisciplinary program.  Ellertson aims to have GIMM students pursue double majors to gain these background communication skills that Madsen-Brooks described.

“There’s a risk if you don’t start from a learning platform that you’re really giving somebody a skill set but not the agility of thought to know over a lifetime how to evolve your thinking,” Jones said.

Ellertson and  Madsen-Brooks applied this philosophy to their own career paths. Ellertson graduated with a degree in rhetoric and professional communication, while Madsen-Brooks has a master’s degree in poetry.

“You’re not your major, and we need to stop treating college like you’re preparing for a single job,” Madsen-Brooks said.

Because of her background in poetry, Madsen-Brooks has been able to write herself into any position she aims for.  This background in the core humanities creates a language for different disciplines to collaborate.

“The humanities have some of the most important things to say to STEM,” Ellertson said.  “GIMM is an effort to bring humanity into technology and start that discussion.”

Jones believes that this conversation is the route higher education should pursue.

“All boats rise when everybody focuses on this, as universities—as industries, as government, as education at the secondary and primary level,” Jones said. “I do see a lot of interest in education for trying to bridge disciplinary boundaries, and I think it is going to be for the benefit of the country if we all get on board.”

But, despite this focus, programs will still be weighed based on their potential revenue and employability factor, which may make the GIMM program more preferable than core humanity programs in the face of statistics and numbers.

Kustra is hopeful that this will not be the case.

“I’m pretty confident that the liberal arts degree will not go away,” Kustra said.  “But there are less people seeking liberal arts degrees because of all the negative stories from employers that want more specific skills.”

Stay up to date on campus news at arbiteronline.com.
Catch Arbiter Minute broadcasts in the Student Union Building throughout the semester and online.
New videos are released every Monday and Thursday throughout the semester.
Featuring Brandon Walton
Directed by Farzan Faramarzi
Edited by Holly Hovis
© Boise State Student Media 2015

Stay up to date on campus news at arbiteronline.com.
Catch Arbiter Minute broadcasts in the Student Union Building throughout the semester and online.
New videos are released every Monday and Thursday throughout the semester.
Featuring Ty Hawkins
Directed by Farzan Faramarzi
Edited by Farzan Faramarzi
© Boise State Student Media 2015

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Boise State Sophomore diver Jordan Marthens was just happy for the opportunity to go to school and be part of the diving team. She never imagined the success she would have so early on.

“Once I got here I knew putting in a lot of hard work was what I needed to do,” Marthens said. “I am happy that it is all paying off.”

Marthens  was the named the MW Diver of the Week earlier in the season and recently earned ALL-MW honors in platform diving at the MW Championships.

“That was so cool,” Marthens said. “I was not expecting that at all and was just happy to be representing Bronco diving.”

Marthens, who grew up in Rancho Santa Margarita, California came into diving late and only out of necessity.

“I had done gymnastics my whole life but my high school didn’t have a gymnastics team,” Marthens said. “It was a really competitive sports area and basically everyone at my school did sports. It was just part of life growing up in that area and I wanted to be part of that culture.”

With no swimming experience, Marthens decided to give diving a try. She felt her gymnastics experience would make for a smooth transition.

She was right.  As a result of this decision, she became a much sought after recruit.

Marthens decided to visit Boise State because  of the connections her club coach had with the university.

“My first reaction was ‘Idaho? Really?’” Marthens said. “I was really unsure about it, but once I got here I knew it was a good fit for me. I really liked the atmosphere of the school and the team was just so welcoming. They made you feel like home and this is where you should be.”

As a freshman she finished ninth at the MW Championships and competed in three events at the NCAA Zone E Diving Championships.

“Last year was more of a learning experience because I didn’t know what to expect coming in,” Marthens said. “This season I was more excited just to go out there and dive to the best I possibly can for my team.”

Head diving coach John Lynch isn’t surprised that this season Marthens has taken her game to the next level.

“Last year we saw the potential in her,” Lynch said. “She put in the work over the summer on her own and now has turned into a tremendous talent for us.”

While Marthens is thrilled to be success, she knows she couldn’t have done it without a few special people.

“My parents have been there for me every step of the way and I have always been able to go to them for everything,” Marthens said.

Marthens will be in action at the NCAA Zone E Diving Championships that get underway March 9.

With two more years left at Boise State, the future looks bright for her and the program.

“I see her as a leader,” senior diver Erin Kohlbeck said. “I know the program is going to be in good hands with her at the helm. There is going to be nothing but good things from her.”

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From only three conference wins in 2011—their first season in the MW—to an 0-3 MW start in 2015, head coach Leon Rice’s hunt for the promised land has been a long one. However, the dream was finally realized Saturday night as the Broncos secured their first MW title.

Back in Derrick Marks’ freshman season, when one win in the MW was hard to clinch, the Boise State men’s basketball head coach instilled belief in his team: one day, the team would be able to win the MW title.

“When all these guys were freshman, the MW title was not on our minds,” Rice said. “I was focused on getting that one win. It was our goal, but to get here in four years is a great feeling. No question.”

Amidst the falling confetti in front of a sell-out crowd following a 71-52 win over Fresno State, the Broncos proved they are indeed one of the top programs in the MW.

“I’m just a little worried I’m going to wake up,” Rice said. “You can’t script it like this. Our guys have a lot of belief. After that (Wyoming) loss, I thought I was going to have to do a lot of convincing. The guys just nodded their head and we went out to work.”

With the win, the Broncos earned a share of the MW title during the regular season with San Diego State. Because of Boise State’s two wins this season over the Aztecs, they hold the tie-breaker and earned the No. 1 seed for the MW Tournament.

The tournament will run March 11-14.

Despite four 20-win seasons in Rice’s five years as the head coach, Rice believes the team needed to win the MW trophy to be considered in an elite program.

Senior guard Igor Hadziomerovic, a freshman during the team’s first year in the MW, agrees the Broncos have arrived.

“This is definitely a program now,” Hadziomerovic said. “We’ve built it over the years and it’s grown and grown. We’re starting to take over the MW now. That will help us a lot.”

Following Anthony Drmic’s season-ending injury, senior Derrick Marks led the team to a 14-1 finish. He is widely considered to be the leading candidate for MW Player of the Year.

“I can’t describe it,” Marks said. “I’ve been talking about (MW title) for the past four years. To get it on senior night­— it’s a blessing.”

Going into this week’s MW Tournament, Rice says the “hungriest dog” will win the MW Tournament. For now, however, he will let the players and coaches soak in the falling confetti and enjoy the cut net dangling from their necks.

Regardless of the outcome of the MW Tournament, the Broncos are likely to earn a bid into the NCAA Tournament for the second time in Rice’s tenure.

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If ten years ago you told Boise State senior diver Erin Kohlbeck that she would be the captain of the diving team and looking to make Boise State history by qualifying for the NCAA Championship she would have looked at you like you were crazy

However, after an unusual path to collegiate diving, that’s exactly the position Kohlbeck finds herself in.

Kohlbeck never planned to become a diver. She instead dreamed of having a gymnastics career and pursued that for most of her young life. It wasn’t until she left the sport before her freshman year of high school that Kohlbeck turned her attention to the sport of diving

“I decided to try diving because I felt it would be a pretty easy transition for me,” Kohlbeck said.

It turned out to be the best decision she could have made. Kohlbeck excelled at the sport by dedicating her life to it. She trained with her team and by herself at the University of Minnesota’s aquatic center.

As a result a plethora of universities took notice and wanted her talent, including Boise State.

“I hadn’t even heard of Boise State before I got an email from the coach at the time,” Kohlbeck said. “My dad told me it might be a good fit because they have a good football team. When I came out here the entire team was awesome.”

Kohlbeck soon decided that Boise State was the place for her and was hoping to make an immediate impact for the team.

Things though didn’t go according to plan.

Kohlbeck struggled her freshman year and was injured her sophomore season.

“After experiencing all of that I wasn’t sure how far I could get,” Kohlbeck said. “When I was sitting there in the conference meet just watching, it killed me.”

Kohlbeck, however, didn’t let her hardships get to her. Instead she used it as a motivator.

“I promised myself from that moment on I was going to work harder,” Kohlbeck said.  “I have and each year I have gotten better. It’s been really exciting to see how far I have come.”

Kohlbeck has had two great years for the Broncos.  She earned All MW honors last season in the 3-meter springboard dive and in platform diving.

She most recently earned All MW honors in the 3-meter springboard, platform and 1-meter springboard.

Head diving coach John Lynch credits her mentality for her success.

“Erin is such a perfectionist,” Lynch said. “She will get out of the water and will just keep doing it again until she gets it just right. She never settle for anything less.”

Kohlbeck credits her parents.

“They have always pushed me to go farther in diving,” Kohlbeck said. “They have always been their to support me and guide me.”

Not only has Kohlbeck excelled in the pool but also in helping her fellow teammates.

“I think of her as my mom on the dive team,” sophomore diver Jordan Marthens said.  “She always looks out for all of us and keeps us in check. She is so supportive and is there whenever we need her.”

Kohlbeck will next be competing in the NCAA Zone E Championship that get underway today March 9.

If she places there, she will become the first Bronco to move onto the NCAA Championships.

No matter what happens Kohlbeck is just grateful for the opportunity she got all those years ago.

“It has really gone by fast and I can’t believe I am a senior,” Kohlbeck said. “I have loved each and every moment I had during my four years here.”

Stay up to date on campus news at arbiteronline.com.
Catch Arbiter Minute broadcasts in the Student Union Building throughout the semester and online.
New videos are released every Monday and Thursday throughout the semester.
Featuring Brandon Walton
Directed by Farzan Faramarzi
Edited by Holly Hovis
© Boise State Student Media 2015

The Boise State men’s basketball team defeat the Fresno State Bulldogs 71-52 to the MW regular season conference champions. With the win the Broncos look to be a lock for the NCAA tournament and will be the number one seed in next week’s MW conference tournament.
Stay up to date on campus news at arbiteronline.com.
Catch Arbiter Minute broadcasts in the Student Union Building throughout the semester and online.
New videos are released every Monday and Thursday throughout the semester.
Featuring Brandon Walton
Directed by Farzan Faramarzi
Edited by Farzan Faramarzi
© Boise State Student Media 2015

Stay up to date on campus news at arbiteronline.com.
Catch Arbiter Minute broadcasts in the Student Union Building throughout the semester and online.
New videos are released every Monday and Thursday throughout the semester.
Featuring Ty Hawkins
Directed by Farzan Faramarzi
Edited by Farzan Faramarzi
© Boise State Student Media 2015

Senior Garrett Patton is the undeniable leader of the Boise State men’s tennis team. He is also the son of prolific head coach Greg Patton. Over the last four years the father son duo has taken the team to new heights and are looking to continue that trend this season.

Stay up to date on campus news at arbiteronline.com.
Catch Arbiter Minute broadcasts in the Student Union Building throughout the semester and online. New videos are released every Monday and Thursday throughout the semester.
Featuring Brandon Walton
Directed by Farzan Faramarzi
Edited by Farzan Faramarzi
© Boise State Student Media 2015

Stay up to date on campus news at arbiteronline.com.
Catch Arbiter Minute broadcasts in the Student Union Building throughout the semester and online.
New videos are released every Monday and Thursday throughout the semester.
Featuring Brandon Walton
Directed by Farzan Faramarzi
Edited by Farzan Faramarzi
© Boise State Student Media 2015