Main Feature

Stay up to date on campus news at arbiteronline.com.
Catch Arbiter Minute broadcasts in the Student Union Building throughout the semester and online.
New videos are released every Monday and Thursday throughout the semester.
Featuring Ty Hawkins
Directed by Farzan Faramarzi
Edited by Farzan Faramarzi
© Boise State Student Media 2015

Senior Garrett Patton is the undeniable leader of the Boise State men’s tennis team. He is also the son of prolific head coach Greg Patton. Over the last four years the father son duo has taken the team to new heights and are looking to continue that trend this season.

Stay up to date on campus news at arbiteronline.com.
Catch Arbiter Minute broadcasts in the Student Union Building throughout the semester and online. New videos are released every Monday and Thursday throughout the semester.
Featuring Brandon Walton
Directed by Farzan Faramarzi
Edited by Farzan Faramarzi
© Boise State Student Media 2015

Stay up to date on campus news at arbiteronline.com.
Catch Arbiter Minute broadcasts in the Student Union Building throughout the semester and online.
New videos are released every Monday and Thursday throughout the semester.
Featuring Brandon Walton
Directed by Farzan Faramarzi
Edited by Farzan Faramarzi
© Boise State Student Media 2015

Stay up to date on campus news at arbiteronline.com.
Catch Arbiter Minute broadcasts in the Student Union Building throughout the semester and online.
New videos are released every Monday and Thursday throughout the semester.
Featuring Ty Hawkins
Directed by Farzan Faramarzi
Edited by Farzan Faramarzi
© Boise State Student Media 2015

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For Kody Dudley, cheerleading in high school was a struggle.

As one of the few male cheerleaders in his region, he was constantly ridiculed by his peers, being called gay or  a girl for doing a sport he loved.

“I played it off like it didn’t bother me, but it affected me to the point that I didn’t want to do it anymore,” Dudley said. “I was like, ‘I’m done. Cheerleading’s not worth it to me.’”

He quit his sophomore year of high school to avoid the harsh words from his peers.

Although more teams are becoming co-ed, male cheerleaders still have to fight against stereotypes and teasing from peers.

Overcoming adversity

Despite hesitation Dudley decided to give cheer one more try during his junior year of high school.

“People stopped making so much fun of us and started saying, ‘Hey man, could you teach me how to do backflip? Could you teach me how to throw that girl?’” Dudley said.

He continued his cheer career into All-Stars, a competitive cheerleading organization, and joined the Broncos in 2014.

At Boise State Dudley met senior Malachi Burt, who has been cheering for Boise State for all four years of his college career.

Burt was no stranger to the male cheerleading stereotype.

In high school, he received athletic scholarship offers for football, track and field, and cheerleading. Although he excelled at each, people were still surprised when he announced his final decision.

“When I chose cheerleading, a lot of people said, ‘Why did you do that? … Why would you choose to be on the sidelines?’”
Burt said.

Burt believes that the stereotypes that male cheerleaders face comes from lack of understanding the athleticism of cheerleading.

“It’s just people not knowing, people not really seeing what we do is something cool until they see something cool,” Burt said. “(When people see something cool), then they’re like, ‘Oh, I don’t really care if that guy is gay or straight. He can throw a girl with one hand.’”

Being a male cheerleader at Boise State.

Since joining the cheer squad at Boise State, Dudley and Burt have been highly respected and recognized by fellow athletes, students and administration. According to Burt, President Kustra knows members of the cheer squad on a first name basis.

Their hard work and dedication are highly appreciated on the team as well. Head coach Tobruk Blaine values the physicality that Dudley and Burt bring.

“It takes four females to do what one guy and one girl can do,” Blaine said.

Males are expected to perform the fight song, do motions, keep rhythm, perform tumbling and stunts, and be able to use a megaphone during tryouts.

Burt wants to perfect every stunt and routine. He believes that by setting a high standard for his performances, people will see him as an athlete.

“I don’t allow people to see me cheer and think anything else but, ‘Wow, that was athletic,’” Burt said. “Whether you’re gay, straight, feminine, a male, a female, a freaking bear or whatever you are, if you’re an athlete, you want to be known as an athlete.”

Not only have Dudley and Burt added a new element of stunting to the team, they unite the team.

“I think they unify us because being around girls all the time can be really exhausting, so they’re there to break that up,” senior flyer Kelsey Messer said. “Having a true co-ed team will set the program apart from other schools.”

Looking to the future

Male cheerleading is on the rise across the nation. According to an article from KTVB, male cheerleading is growing in Treasure Valley high schools. Blaine wants to continue to grow Boise State’s program by adding more men to the team.

Blaine is hoping to recruit and maintain more male cheerleaders from surrounding areas. Blaine wants to travel to competitions to promote the program. She hopes to have at least six men on the cheer squad every season. Currently, Dudley is the only male cheerleader hoping to return next year.

“No one has done male recruiting in this job, so it’s going to take me going out and reaching to those males who are involved with cheerleading …” Blaine said.

Dudley has seen male cheerleading grow and become more accepted in Idaho. He hopes the growth will continue and more people will start to respect cheerleading as a sport.

“People know football, basketball, baseball and stuff like that,” Dudley said. “I want them to recognize cheerleading as one of the top sports, something that you just can’t do because you have nothing else better to do with your time. You have to be a good athlete to do it.”

Stay up to date on campus news at arbiteronline.com.
Catch Arbiter Minute broadcasts in the Student Union Building throughout the semester and online.
New videos are released every Monday and Thursday throughout the semester.
Featuring Brandon Walton
Directed by Farzan Faramarzi
Edited by Farzan Faramarzi
© Boise State Student Media 2015

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The odds of having identical twins is about 1 in 400 according to the National Health Services.

The odds of having identical twins on the same team in college, well, much slimmer.

Brittney and Brooke Pahukoa of the Boise State women’s basketball team are the only set of twin basketball players currently in women’s Division I basketball.

“They are just absolutely fabulous people and really good players,” said head coach Gordy Presnell. “You can just predict success for them. They know they have the ability both physically and mentally to accomplish whatever they want to do.”

An integral part of their success has been their father Jeff, a six-year veteran of
the NFL.

“We always get a lot of wisdom from him,” Brooke said. “He taught us the true meaning of sports and why you do it.”

Growing up in Lake Stevens, Washington, Brittney and Brooke did everything together, including playing sports. From soccer and track to basketball, they both became standout players for their high school team.

Despite the almost never ending list of similarities, there is one key difference between the two—whereas Brooke is an adventurous spirit, Brittney is more reserved and calm.

“She is the outgoing one,” Brittney said. “She is always telling me, ‘Let’s go do this,’ and I just would rather stay in all day.”

The twins are so competitive that they aren’t even allowed to play against one another.

“We have played four times against each other and every time one of us has gotten hurt,” Brittney said.

The twins were not planning on going to the same school together.  As fate would have it though,
they did.

“When we were deciding on what school to go to, we decided we would choose separately,” Brittney said. “We ended up both choosing Boise State.”

Brooke is having a breakout season for the Broncos. She is third on the team in scoring with 9.6 points per game, second in steals, second in three-point percentage and leads the team in free throw percentage with an outstanding 93.8 percent from the charity stripe.

She credits much of her success this season to Brittney.

“She calms me down and I need that,” Brooke said. “Sometimes I am going a mile a minute or I am stressed because I am not making my shots or whatever else is going wrong, and all I have to do is look over at her and I am instantly alright.”

Brittney, on the other hand, has been plagued with injuries this season.

“It has been difficult, but I will take every little chance and the role I have now to help the team,” Brittney said. “Hopefully next year I can go more than two weeks without getting injured so I can really make a difference.”

For Brooke, it has been hard seeing her sister go through so much pain and it has affected her play.

“This season, it has really motivated me to play with more passion,” Brooke said. “The fact that this season she really hasn’t gotten the opportunity to play makes me play for her. I take every opportunity I can on the floor to play for the both of us.”

Last season, it was Brooke that was the one who was battling injury with walking pneumonia.

The twins envision a future where both of them are healthy and provide a one-two punch for the team.

“We love playing together so it would be wonderful to play alongside her,”
Brooke said.

 

Stay up to date on campus news at arbiteronline.com.
Catch Arbiter Minute broadcasts in the Student Union Building throughout the semester and online.
New videos are released every Monday and Thursday throughout the semester.
Featuring Ty Hawkins
Directed by Farzan Faramarzi
Edited by Farzan Faramarzi
© Boise State Student Media 2015

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When Dianne Piggott was born, doctors told her parents they had a son.  In the end, that socially-constructed gender assignment didn’t work out.

After trying to live life as a man for several years, Piggott decided to transition and become the woman she knew she was internally, at least, everywhere except for work.

Her decision to fully transition in every portion of her life became apparent to her when she had to race home, change her appearance to that of a “man” and hurry back to work.

“I had to take off my hair, wash my face and really just change myself,” the junior psychology major said.  “I looked in the mirror and started to cry and think, ‘Who is that?  That’s not me.’”

After years of struggling with her identity, Piggott joined the Add the Words movement. However, despite recent efforts from the group, the bill was defeated again  in committee on Jan. 29.

This left Piggott and countless others facing potential discrimination on the basis of gender identity and sexual orientation. Many believe a contributing factor to this continued oppression is a distinct lack of understanding surrounding gender identity.

“It’s not necessarily people wanting to be willfully ignorant,” said Christopher Dale, sophomore French major who identifies as gender nonconforming or agender.  “It’s more of people not having access to information.”

For graduate English student Thomas Meissner, this lack of information has created several uncomfortable situations, including slurs heard through the walls of their student-housing apartment.

Meissner identifies as genderqueer and their personal expression, through clothing and mannerisms, occasionally becomes a topic of disdain among peers.

“They just need to take me more seriously,” Meissner said.  “Otherwise, I just wonder how I’m going to eventually interact with these people.”

According to Meissner, ignorance surrounding gender identity and its integral role within a person has created harsh attitudes.  Because these mannerisms are so deeply embedded in mainstream culture, they exist in commonplace things, such as binary-focused male and female choices on Scantron sheets.

In some instances, these attitudes manifest in harmful ways.

The American Foundation for Suicide Prevention reported that 41 percent of transgender or gender-nonconforming individuals have attempted suicide.  According to the Black Lives Matter’s website the life expectancy of black transgender woman is 35.

In every state except California, it is still legal to claim transgender-induced panic as a reasoning for violence toward these individuals.

“Everyone has a different gender identity, gender expression and sexual orientation,” said Kate Steven, program coordinator at the Women’s Center.  “They don’t all match up all the time.”

Steven stressed the utilization of preferred pronouns and non-gendered language in order to be more inclusive of all identities.  Steven, who identifies as genderqueer, uses they/them/their pronouns and encouraged all people to focus on using pronouns as such until a person shares the pronouns they would like to be called.

Steven suggested sharing pronouns at the beginning of class each semester in order to create a more inviting space and avoid misgendering some students.

Landon Browning, one of two gender equity peer educators at the Women’s Center, invited all students to find communities to learn more about gender identity or explore their own identity.  As the past president of the Pride Alliance, he explained that all students, whether they are cisgender, transgender or questioning, can find ways to enter this discussion or find support if needed.

“Boise in general is just not as diverse as other places,” Browning said.  “We can all benefit from being exposed to diversity, changing our perspectives and helping evolve other perspectives.”

According to Dale, the best method of becoming informed is listening.  They explained this can start by dropping initial assumptions.

“The way somebody presents themself is not necessarily how they identify,” Dale said.  “You never know somebody’s gender identity until you ask.”

Dale explained these assumptions can also translate into uninformed labeling.

Instead of immediately labeling people as male or female, some sections of mainstream media have instead began labeling others as transgender or nonconforming, which, according to Dale, is just as much of a problem.

Bruce Jenner has headlined tabloids for weeks, and popular organizations have declared him transgender because of his “feminine” tendencies.  These organizations have no insight from Jenner on the topic.

Dale explained the only expert source on an individual’s gender identity is that sole individual, something the media has failed to realize in
Jenner’s case.

“They see his long hair and fingernails and assume, ‘Oh, he must be trans,’” Dale said.  “It’s very interesting that non-trans people are claiming authority on someone’s who may or may not be trans’ identity.”

Piggott hopes that, through her work with Add the Words and other inclusive efforts within Boise society, Boise State and its surrounding areas can become a more welcoming place for those exploring their gender identity.

“We’re not scary and we’re not threatening,” Piggott said.  “We’re just people.”

Stay up to date on campus news at arbiteronline.com.
Catch Arbiter Minute broadcasts in the Student Union Building throughout the semester and online.
New videos are released every Monday and Thursday throughout the semester.
Featuring Brandon Walton
Directed by Farzan Faramarzi
Edited by Holly Hovis
© Boise State Student Media 2015

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All I wanted to do while watching this film was shove popcorn in my face, turn my off my brain and enjoy an entertaining movie.

“Jupiter Ascending” didn’t give me that.

“Jupiter Ascending” is the story of this ordinary girl Jupiter, played by Mila Kunis. She just happens to be the reincarnated soul of a galactic queen. As a result, she is hunted across the galaxy by Balem, played by Eddie Redmayne. Not to fear though Caine, played by Channing Tatum, is there to protect her.

Sounds like a cool premise right? It is, but it’s executed poorly.

The film is so convoluted that it’s going to make your brain hurt. The movie does a horrible job of explaining its plot. There is no cohesiveness to be found and what you get is a series of out of place sequences that are confusing as hell.

If that wasn’t bad enough, the film is incredibly dull. The film’s repetitiveness drags it to a screeching halt.

This is what viewers get to see for two hours: Jupiter gets in trouble! Oh wait, here comes Caine to save her. Oh no! She’s in trouble again. Oh wait, there’s Caine.

Oh, and why is Jupiter being hunted?

As queen, she owns a tiny spot of land: the Earth. The entire film’s premise is basically an intergalactic squabble over land. Yes you heard that right. They might as well just made Monopoly in Space: The Movie. It would have been a better film.

The performances in this movie are horrendous. Tatum, Kunis, and especially Redmayne are horrific. Both Tatum and Kunis bring absolutely no emotion to their character and instead just spew garbage.

These performances, however, are nothing compared to the truly awful performance of Redmayne as the film’s main antagonist.

If you have seen the trailer you have heard the atrocious voice he uses. It sounds like how my grandpa would talk if he were constipated.  Combine this with his way over the top antics and you have one awful villain–and not in a good way.

After watching this movie you would never think that Redmayne is up for an Oscar this year.

I can’t entirely blame everything on the actors as they were dealing with some of the worst dialogue I have ever heard. It is not just bad, but laugh out loud I can’t believe they just said that bad.

I kid you not their are lines in this film that go like this:

“Oh please call me Jup,” and “I love dogs. I have always loved dogs.”

The only few positives in this film are the visual and special effects, which are incredible. It doesn’t look like a February movie but that of a summer blockbuster. There are many mesmerizing scenes that do blow your hair back.

Outside of its visuals this film truly offers nothing of merit and it’s hard to fathom how the same people that made the “The Matrix,” “Cloud Atlas” and “V for Vendetta” made this.

2.5/10

The Boise State Broncos were able to continue their winning streak tonight when they defeated Air Force 67-42. With the win the Broncos have won eight in a row and are just a half game back in the MW Standings.
Stay up to date on campus news at arbiteronline.com.
Catch Arbiter Minute broadcasts in the Student Union Building throughout the semester and online. New videos are released every Monday and Thursday throughout the semester.
Featuring Brandon Walton
Directed by Farzan Faramarzi
Edited by Farzan Faramarzi
© Boise State Student Media 2015

Stay up to date on campus news at arbiteronline.com.
Catch Arbiter Minute broadcasts in the Student Union Building throughout the semester and online.
New videos are released every Monday and Thursday throughout the semester.
Featuring Ty Hawkins
Directed by Farzan Faramarzi
Edited by Farzan Faramarzi
© Boise State Student Media 2015

Stay up to date on campus news at arbiteronline.com.
Catch Arbiter Minute broadcasts in the Student Union Building throughout the semester and online.
New videos are released every Monday and Thursday throughout the semester.
Featuring Brandon Walton
Directed by Holly Hovis
Edited by Holly Hovis
© Boise State Student Media 2015

Stay up to date on campus news at arbiteronline.com.
Catch Arbiter Minute broadcasts in the Student Union Building throughout the semester and online. New videos are released every Monday and Thursday throughout the semester.
Featuring Ty Hawkins
Directed by Farzan Faramarzi
Edited by Farzan Faramarzi
© Boise State Student Media 2015

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Once the movie began the overwhelming aroma of overpriced popcorn faded into the background as my eyes zeroed in on the screen. Nothing could distract me from this remarkable experience. I was mesmerized.

“Birdman” starts by diving into the life of Riggan, an actor who abandoned the wildly popular role of Birdman back in the day. Tired of making those movies, Riggan decides he wants to do work of substance instead of being typecast into doing the same thing over again.

Riggan’s new aspirations don’t quite work out for him. He becomes a washed-up actor but tries to make a comeback with his broadway play adaptation of Raymond Carver’s story “What We Talk About When We Talk About Love.” Much to his dismay, the play, his coworkers, and most importantly himself undergo severe problems which leads to an identity crisis for everyone involved.

This is without a doubt the most original movie I have ever seen.

The impressive editing technique and the way the movie was shot makes the entire movie seem like one big long shot. This technique makes this movie feel like it has veracity and unpredictability element to it . This is a spectacular, original, groundbreaking achievement in cinema that really adds to the greatness of this film.

Michael Keaton, who plays Riggan, does a tremendous job in with this role. He was the perfect person to play this role because, in a sense, he himself is this character. Keaton took from his real life experiences and incorporated them into the role.  He reflects on his own career and is not afraid to take shots at himself. Batman anyone? This is the best performance of his career and is well deserving of his Oscar nomination. He should be considered a front runner to win Oscar gold. The rest of cast is fantastic as well, with Edward Norton, Emma Stone, and Zach Galifianakis all giving exceptional performances to boot.

The social commentary is both interesting and comical. It takes a very critical look at the movie industry as a whole and turns it around on itself. “Birdman” takes shots at blockbuster films that come out annually and asks a couple of questions. Are these movies really good films? Can you call yourself a real actor if you do these type of movies? Is it better to do independent films for the artistic value of them. It even commentates on  film reviewers and  whether or not these critics really are in touch with today’s film and audience.

The psychological aspect of this movie makes each and every character feel they have a completely different side to them.  Keaton’s split personality, Stone’s battle with drug addiction and her sense to belong and Edward Norton’s sense of realism add another layer to this already complex film. 

“Birdman” is a must see for any movie fanatic out there and truly a mind blowing experience to be had. Come Oscar Time don’t be surprised if this movie cleans house.

10/10

 

Stay up to date on campus news at arbiteronline.com.
Catch Arbiter Minute broadcasts in the Student Union Building throughout the semester and online. New videos are released every Monday and Thursday throughout the semester.
Featuring Brandon Walton
Directed by Farzan Faramarzi
Edited by Farzan Faramarzi
© Boise State Student Media 2015

Stay up to date on campus news at arbiteronline.com.
Catch Arbiter Minute broadcasts in the Student Union Building throughout the semester and online. New videos are released every Monday and Thursday throughout the semester.
Featuring Ty Hawkins
Directed by Farzan Faramarzi
Edited by Farzan Faramarzi
© Boise State Student Media 2015

The Boise State Broncos were able to upset #24 Colorado State 82-78. With the win the Broncos have won five in a row and are tied for third in the MW standings.

Stay up to date on campus news at arbiteronline.com.
Catch Arbiter Minute broadcasts in the Student Union Building throughout the semester and online. New videos are released every Monday and Thursday throughout the semester.
Featuring Brandon Walton
Directed by Farzan Faramarzi
Edited by Farzan Faramarzi
© Boise State Student Media 2015

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“American Sniper is lighting up the box office with over 200 million dollars in the United States alone, and, in addition, the film has six Oscar nominations. It goes without saying there is a lot of hype surrounding this film.

So does this movie live up to all the hype? Yes it does–for the most part. While it is no “Saving Private Ryan,” “American Sniper” is a refreshing take on the war genre of film and focuses on the psyche of war that few movies have taken on over the years.

I really loved how the film was able to focus on the humanity of war and what it does to a person like Chris Kyle. The movie could have focused solely on Kyle’s being the most deadly sniper in American history and the glory found in his war tactics. But, It didn’t, and I loved how director Clint Eastwood didn’t fall in that typical war movie trap. Eastwood was instead able to bring out the human condition of war that many people don’t often think of. His focus on PTSD was an excellent choice and definitely added more layers to the film by bringing humanity to Kyle’s character.

The portrayal of Kyle is done magnificently by star Bradley Cooper.  Cooper shines in the role and does a terrific job of bringing Kyle’s war torn soul to life. He is certainly deserving of his best actor Oscar nomination.

While the movie does bring up and mention Kyle’s mental toll, it doesn’t follow it through all the way.  The film could have gone deeper and, at times, feels like it only scratches the surface of this man’s psyche. Why does he choose to go back to war over and over again while ignoring his family’s pleas to stay home? Issues like these could have been better explored in the film.

The film has many nail biting and tense war scenes to go along with Kyle’s emotional journey. This gives the film a nice, steady balance. The film explores several moral dilemmas, including an intensified scene where Kyle has to decide whether or not to shoot a mom and her son that appear to be threatening a platoon of soldiers.

Overall, “American Sniper is a well-acted and well-told story of Chris Kyle’s military accomplishments in the field of battle. Its emotional exploration of what Kyle goes through brings out the true human spark that we don’t see often in war.

8.5/10

Stay up to date on campus news at arbiteronline.com.
Catch Arbiter Minute broadcasts in the Student Union Building throughout the semester and online. New videos are released every Monday and Thursday throughout the semester.
Featuring Brandon Walton
Directed by Farzan Faramarzi
Edited by Holly Hovis
© Boise State Student Media 2015

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The annual Beauty and the Beast event took place at Taco Bell Arena on Jan. 23. Here is a video recap of the event along with several interviews with coaches and players from both the wrestling and gymnastics team.

Stay up to date on campus news at arbiteronline.com.
Catch Arbiter Minute broadcasts in the Student Union Building throughout the semester and online. New videos are released every Monday and Thursday throughout the semester.
Featuring Brandon Walton
Directed by Farzan Faramarzi
Edited by Farzan Faramarzi
© Boise State Student Media 2015

Stay up to date on campus news at arbiteronline.com.
Catch Arbiter Minute broadcasts in the Student Union Building throughout the semester and online. New videos are released every Monday and Thursday throughout the semester.
Featuring Ty Hawkins
Directed by Farzan Faramarzi
Edited by Farzan Faramarzi
© Boise State Student Media 2015

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Stay up to date on campus news at arbiteronline.com.
Catch Arbiter Minute broadcasts in the Student Union Building throughout the semester and online. New videos are released every Monday and Thursday throughout the semester.
Featuring Brandon Walton
Directed by Farzan Faramarzi
Edited by Holly Hovis
© Boise State Student Media 2015

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Stay up to date on campus news at arbiteronline.com.
Catch Arbiter Minute broadcasts in the Student Union Building throughout the semester and online. New videos are released every Monday and Thursday throughout the semester.
Featuring Ty Hawkins
Directed by Farzan Faramarzi
Edited by Farzan Faramarzi
© Boise State Student Media 2015