Main Feature

Boise State students Ty Hawkins and Brandon Walton discuss the upcoming Boise State and BYU.

Stay up to date on campus news at arbiteronline.com.
Catch Arbiter Minute broadcasts in the Student Union Building throughout the semester and online. New videos are released every Monday and Thursday throughout the semester.
Featuring Brandon Walton, Ty Hawkins
Directed by Farzan Faramarzi
Edited by Farzan Faramarzi
© Boise State Student Media 2014

Boise State students Ty Hawkins and Brandon Walton discuss the upcoming Boise State and Fresno State.

Stay up to date on campus news at arbiteronline.com.
Catch Arbiter Minute broadcasts in the Student Union Building throughout the semester and online.
New videos are released every Monday and Thursday throughout the semester.
Featuring Brandon Walton, Ty Hawkins
Directed by Farzan Faramarzi
Edited by Farzan Faramarzi
© Boise State Student Media 2014

On Sept. 5-6, Boise State ROTC had field training in Idaho City, which happens once a semester. The cadets practiced handling navigation, threat and ambush response and Blackhawk riding training. The cadets were warned their first experience riding in the Blackhawks might make them motion sick, and there are no bathrooms on the helicopters. Cadets expressed their appreciation for the leadership execution and training.

Stay up to date on campus news at arbiteronline.com.

Film-Edit by Farzan Faramarzi
© Boise State Student Media 2014

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Boise State's partnership with Learfield Sports has brought in $10 million in revenue since 2010.

First and foremost, sports is a business. The focus of college athletics will always be on the athletes and the playbook, but make no mistake, athletic departments need revenue to keep the program running.

Advertisement sales are one of the primary ways the Boise State Athletic Department brings in revenue. In order to make sure the athletic department sells enough advertisements to keep the program running, the Broncos are aided by Bronco Sports Properties, LLC, a subsidiary of Learfield Sports.

What is Learfield Sports?

For years, the Broncos sold all of their advertisements in house. As the university and athletic department grew, Boise State needed to find an organization with the infrastructure to keep up with the growing demand for advertising sales.

In 2010, a seven year contract between Learfield Sports and Boise State was, with three one-year options that could extend the deal to 2020. In August of this year, Boise State and Learfield Sports reconstructed their contract to extend to 2025.

“We don’t have that infrastructure of hiring people and having a sales staff,” said Max Corbet, associate athletic director of communications “They(Learfield Sports) already have that built in.”

Essentially, Learfield Sports acts as a middle man between athletic departments and companies that may wish to advertise.Learfield Sports and all of their subsidiaries gain the exclusive media rights to the athletic department they work with in return for their advertisement expertise.

Bronco Sports Properties LLC operates with a staff of four under the direction of general manager Dan Hawley. They have their own office space in the Stueckle Sky Center and receive a commission for their advertisement sales.

Since Learfield Sports owns the media rights for the Broncos.  Radio announcer Bob Behler is an official employee of Learfield Sports.

Learfield Sports has partnerships with nearly 100 universities across the nation. According to Corbet, a larger school such as Louisiana State could employ a staff upwards of 10 due to the demand.

Learfield Sports originally was commissioned to solicit the naming rights for then Bronco Stadium. As it happened, Boise State played a much larger role in the deal with Albertsons due to the university’s past history with the company.

The $12.5 million deal to rename the football stadium to Albertsons Stadium generated $3,418,750 for Learfield Sports. The other $9,081,250 went to Boise State.

The New Contract

Boise State’s original contract with Learfield Sports was set to run from 2010-2017 for $10.408 million, with three one-year extensions that would bring the deal up to $19.263 million.

After four years, however, Boise State has become  a much more profitable athletic department. The new restructured deal between Learfield Sports and Boise State now totals $44.058 million from 2013-2025.

Corbet feels the Broncos’ history with Learfield Sports has been beneficial for both parties.

“We have guaranteed money with this deal,” Corbet said. “Whether they sell those ads or not, we get that revenue no matter what. It all goes back into the pot and then pay us back. They set up all the partnerships. From a budgetary standpoint, it’s a lot easier to budget.”

According to the revenue share hurdle clause in the contract between the two parties, Boise State gains any surplus revenue from advertisement sales.

Compensation for Learfield Sports

Boise State is not the only benefactor in this deal. Members of the Bronco Sports Properties, LLC team all receive commissions from their advertisement sales.

In return for their services, Learfield Sports also gains access to several club-level seating and luxury boxes.

According to Corbet, Learfield Sports uses these to solidify partnerships with current clients and as well as to entice new clients.

“They have x number of tickets,” Corbet said. “For the most part, they are definitely for taking care of clients. They are always looking at ways to increase their revenue. It’s advantageous for both. We want to help them so they can help us gain new partnerships.”

In the contract between the two parties, Boise State also receives $100,000 from Learfield Sports each year as a capital stipend. This stipend must be used by the Broncos to improve their marketability and advertisement carrying possibilities.

According to the contract, Boise State can use that stipend for “such items as the purchase and installation of a center-hung video board for Taco Bell Arena, or other mutually agreeable venue enhancements.”

Both parties must agree on what the capital stipend is spent on.

Stay up to date on campus news at arbiteronline.com. Catch Arbiter Minute broadcasts in the Student Union Building throughout the semester and online. New videos are released every Monday and Thursday throughout the semester.

Featuring Brandon Walton
Directed by Farzan Faramarzi
Edited by Holly Hovis
© Boise State Student Media 2014

 

Stay up to date on campus news at arbiteronline.com. Catch Arbiter Minute broadcasts in the Student Union Building throughout the semester and online. New videos are released every Monday and Thursday throughout the semester.

Featuring Brandon Walton
Directed by Farzan Faramarzi
Edited by Farzan Faramarzi
© Boise State Student Media 2014

Stay up to date on campus news at arbiteronline.com.
Catch Arbiter Minute broadcasts in the Student Union Building throughout the semester and online. New videos are released every Monday and Thursday throughout the semester.
Featuring Brandon Walton 
Directed by Farzan Faramarzi
Edited by Farzan Faramarzi
© Boise State Student Media 2014 

Stay up to date on campus news at arbiteronline.com.
Catch Arbiter Minute broadcasts in the Student Union Building throughout the semester and online. New videos are released every Monday and Thursday throughout the semester.
Featuring Brandon Walton
Directed by Farzan Faramarzi
Edited by Farzan Faramarzi
© Boise State Student Media 2014

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Photo by Nate Lowery
The Steuckle Sky Center was built in 2008 as a renovation to now Albertsons Stadium.

Albertsons Stadium has undergone many changes since the current stadium was first built in the fall
of 1970.

 Originally built with the seating capacity of 14,500, the capacity of the stadium has more doubled. Today the total stadium capacity sits at  36,387, making it the sixth largest stadium in the MW.

 Over the past five years, Albertsons Stadium has seen several major changes such as the construction of the Stueckle Sky Center and the construction of seating in the north and south end zones.

 Built in 2008, the Stueckle Sky Center marked the first major renovations to the formerly Bronco Stadium since 1997 when the capacity was increased to 30,000.

The completion of the Sky Center raised the total capacity of the stadium to 32,000.

 The 131,000 square feet  Sky Center features club seating, sky boxes, as well as the press box for
football games.

 In 2009, temporary seating built in the north and south end zones added an additional 1,500 seats to the Stadium before permanent seating in those same locations were completed in the summer of 2012.

 That renovation increased the stadium capacity to what it currently remains at today.

In partnership with the Double R Ranch, Albertsons Stadium was able to make a major upgrade with a new 47 x 78 foot video board in the south end zone.

 Besides the capacity increases and the construction of the Bleymaier Football Center to the north of the stadium, perhaps the biggest change to Albertsons Stadium occurred this past summer.

For 43 years, Boise State football competed in their home games at what used to be Bronco Stadium. A deal between Boise State and Albertsons reached this May led to the renaming of the stadium to Albertsons Stadium.

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“My personal thought is I think if they donate a lot of money to our stadium, they should be able to put their name on it.”

– Cody Wetherelt, sophomore linguistics major

“I think it’s just a great advertisement. Albertsons is located corporately here. It’s just like an NFL team.”

– Jaime Suhr, junior exercise science major

“I liked Bronco Stadium more. It had more of a Boise State feel. It’s always going to be Bronco Stadium to me.”

– Kolby Overstreet, senior physics major

“I like the Bronco Stadium a lot more. We already have Albertsons Library. It feels like it’s another curriculum building.”

– Tommy Miller, senior communication major

Stay up to date on campus news at arbiteronline.com.
Catch Arbiter Minute broadcasts in the Student Union Building throughout the semester and online. New videos are released every Monday and Thursday throughout the semester.
Featuring Brandon Walton
Directed by Farzan Faramarzi
Edited by Farzan Faramarzi
© Boise State Student Media 2014 – 

While the Quad is generally home to religious pamphlets featuring Biblical verses and doctrine-oriented miniature comic books or high gloss leaflets, the series of walkways was instead home to several cardboard boxes filled with full-length novels. Author Rich Shapero often promotes his new novels with giveaways at various universities across the country including Yale in 2010. This past Wednesday, May 7, he selected Boise State University as the next site of his “The Hope We Seek” promotion. “The Hope We Seek” is a multimedia storytelling experience that combines fiction, music, and artwork into one package that grew and evolved along the same creationary period, as is the norm with Shapero’s other works that he passes out in promotion. This particular project contained a combination of a 432-page hardcover novel, along with a CD of 10 songs and an accompanying pamphlet of song lyrics and illustrations. “Because I have a great passion for words and ideas, I’ve attempted to put my peculiar intuitions into story form and make them available to others,” Shapero said. The novel is written by Shapero, and the music included with it is composed and partly performed by Shapero as well. The CD also features the vocals of Marissa Nadler and the instrumental work of various other artists. Shapero plays the acoustic guitar and mandola on these tracks. The novel follows the plight of Zachary Knox on a journey for gold. He and his newfound companion, Sephy, whom he meets on his path to a mining camp, discover that the workplace they’ve found themselves in the midst of houses a cult with the mining boss, Trevillian, as their dark priest. As described on Shapero’s website, “Zack determines to overthrow Trevillian, guided by Sephy’s cryptic directions­—until Hope appears and reveals the astonishing future she has in mind for him.” The online synopsis continues, “Rich Shapero once again holds a dark mirror to the passions that drive us, and the extremes to which we go to find meaning in our lives.” As a primary means of income, Shapero is a venture capitalist, having put forth money toward several successful start-up companies. In particular, he is a partner at Crosspoint and a board member at AristaSoft and New Edge Networks. This has allowed him to produce and give away his newest pieces of writing and artwork in such high volume. “I have no commercial motive,” explained Shapero. “I’m like a street musician playing for whoever might have the interest to stop and listen.” Because of this, Shapero is completely fine with giving his books, music, e-books and tablet-based writing for free. While growing up, Shapero was introduced to new means of thinking and ideas through a group of artists. Having a lesser connection with his genealogical ties, Shapero found his own familial ties in this group of artists that he “looked up to and embraced.” “I’m reaching out to younger members of that same family, whoever and wherever they might be,” Shapero said. He encourages readers and art consumers to contact him if they find something of value within his work. “I know it’s a small group, but there are ‘like minds’ out there that will understand and connect with what I’m doing.” Shapero said. Among his own artistic inspirations, Shapero found a strong tie-in to music and rhythm, therefore tying it further into his own endeavors. “The rhythm and melody of language gave (the text) the power to transport us into the emotional domain of an unseen world,” he explained. “For most of my life, I had little confidence that any of these projects would ever see the light of day. It’s a miracle to me that things worked out,” Shapero said.  The author is currently continuing his promotion of “The Hope We Seek” while investing further time into writing his fourth novel.