About the author  ⁄ Zoe Colburn

Zoe is a freshman Communications major who spends far too much time holed up in her room watching movies. She hopes to someday be an entertainment journalist.

The theater is small, painted black, ceiling to floor. The stage, really just the floor, is backlit. Trees line the back of the stage. In front of them, four large windows stand—two smaller on the left and right of the stage, two larger in the middle center. In the open space where glass would be, there is lace stretched in the frame. Each window notes a new room. Unsettling and hauntingly beautiful music plays as the audience filters in. The lights dim, the music gets louder. When the lights come up again, there are five people standing on the stage. ...

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It’s a small room with three tables in three corners, a projection screen in the other, about 15 to 20 chairs and a large notepad at the front. The Healthy Relationships Comic-Con was a workshop on what constitutes a healthy relationship, including how cultural perceptions of race, gender and sexual orientation can affect relationships. It used comic book characters as a medium to connect to the attendees. Sophomore Amanda Griffin set up and was in charge of the event. “I love comic books,” she said. “So I saw we had a comic book club, and we always co-sponsor with other ...

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Langston Hughes is one of the best-known American poets. His poetry is read and discussed by thousands of students, as well as by poetry lovers all over the world. After a performance in the Newport Jazz Festival in June 1960, Hughes wrote a 12-part poem and musical accompaniment entitled “Ask Your Mama: 12 Moods for Jazz.” On April 5, Ron McCurdy, Ph.D, will bring a multimedia performance of this poem suite to Boise State. This performance will be brought to campus by ASBSU, the Arts and Humanities Institute (AHI) and the Cultural and Ethnic Diversity Board (CEDB). Fifteen years ago ...

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Treefort ended its second-annual run on Sunday, and despite the highly disagreeable weather, the end result was a great weekend which provided an awesome kick-off to spring break. With some big-name indie artists like El Ten Eleven, Youth Lagoon and AU as well as a lot of lesser-known (and many times local) artists like NUDE POP, Shades and Hallowed Oak, not to mention the three sets Built To Spill played–it was pretty hard to go wrong, even just blindly picking artists at random from the schedule. While walking and standing and generally being on your feet four days straight can ...

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Sometimes, you just gotta get off the beaten track, forge your own way through the indie jungle, forget the mainstream and travel by creek, or maybe groundwater? Luckily, Treefort is home to many an unknown band and artist. 2:20 p.m. The Red Room (21+) Pony Village Pony Village has a distinct nostalgic feel to their music. The Portland-based quintet uses that to their advantage, hacking into I-remember-when and The Good Old Days-type feelings with their magic-infused lyrics. 3:00 p.m. The Crux Hallowed Oak Psych-Folk five-piece band Hallowed Oak provides the perfect music to feel like a teenager on a road ...

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With Treefort Music Festival only two weeks away, the Student Union Performance Series (SUPS) wizards joined forces with the Treefort organizers and held a preview show on Thursday, March 7. Grandma Kelsey and Sun Blood Stories, two of the bands to play at the festival, played for anyone interested. Amy Rajkovich, a first-year graduate student and the student union fine arts program assistant, helped put the show together. “This one in particular was easy,” she said. “I worked with Eric Gilbert and he puts on Treefort.” The preview show began with a performance from Grandma Kelsey, a one-woman band composed ...

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“Thoroughly Modern Millie” began its life as a movie in 1967, but it wasn’t until 2002 when it hit the stage as a Broadway production. Now, the timeless tale of a country girl setting out in the big city will be presented by the Boise State Theater Arts Department and the Music Department. The plot’s timelessness is what drew theater director and director of the show Robert Klausch, Ph.D to the play. “I just love the fact that this show represents so many different periods of our 20th and now 21st century culture,” Klausch said. “It comes from the 1960s, ...

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The consumerist culture that surrounds much of society has been widely debated for years, and it has a nasty habit of creeping its way into every facet of life—including education. There’s always one student who thinks they know better than the professor, or that the university exists for the sole purpose of catering to their whims and making them as comfortable as possible. The consumerist mentality creates this view of the university as a business, and in some ways maybe it is, but the purpose of education isn’t to create a comfort zone, but rather to escape the comfort zones ...

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“It’s in the house,” Verne whispers, in terror, into the phone held tight in his hand. A green, web-footed monster jumps on the stage; splashing sounds come from the speakers. The arrival of the monster has been long anticipated with much of the first act of “A Nighttime Survival Guide” seemingly leading up to this point. It’s the story of a preteen boy living in Arco, Idaho and his penpal Aki, a girl in Japan learning to survive the night and how to get rid of monsters that might be real. Three performers handle the limbs and head with rods ...

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Gossip is a pretty big part of human existence—we tend to default to talking about the affairs of other people when we don’t know what else to say. It’s easy to fall into, “Did you hear about Karen and Lee?” and “Can you believe he would say that to me?” And with the recent rise and fall of Boise State University Confessions, the thought springs to the front of the mind: is Boise State really that gossipy? Maybe. But the confessions offered an outlet where students could say otherwise very secret things publicly in a fashion similar to Frank Warren’s ...

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Attendance requirements during flu season are the worst thing ever. It turns what is usually a gross time of year into a gross and challenging time of year. I’ve probably blown my nose about 57 times every day since the beginning of December; that’s an approximate number. I don’t even have any kind of sickness. However, with it being flu season, my stuffy nose can sometimes fool me into believing it’s something more sinister. The flu is all up in Boise, and I am super worried about getting sick, mostly because being sick in college is vastly different from being ...

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School is back in session, and I am nowhere near ready to enter back. It’s sort of like August all over again, but without the soul-clenching fear and excitement that accompanies leaving for college for the first time, and a little more experience in being a student. The main difference from August, however, is that rather than already being excited about leaving for a brand new school experience, I need to sort of psych myself up to get back to work. To do that, I’ve mostly been ignoring the fact that it’s coming up, but now that it’s become inevitable, ...

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Happy Apocalypse Week, everyone. I hope you are all prepared with guns and canned food and boarded-up windows, lest the zombies or radioactive bombs or whatever natural causes will cause the world to spontaneously explode (or implode) get you. Ironically it is happening right during finals week. Despite the common belief that the end of the world will be a horrible occurrence, the timing of this apocalypse is good news for those who have been letting their academics slide. So if you didn’t get straight As it’s not a problem. Hopefully we are not let down yet again—I can’t begin ...

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Winter has finally decided to grace us with her presence, if the 2 millimeters of snow that gathered Sunday morning is any indication. And if the snow wasn’t convincing enough, try taking a look around campus—you can’t go anywhere without running into garlands or Christmas trees. There are windows painted with the snow we wish we had, and baubles painted in the windowsills of the Starbucks. Even the library isn’t free from the cheer boasting a quirky tree made of books and a parrot tree-topper. All these symbols of winter are enough for anyone to turn full-on Grinch. There’s nothing ...

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In a reinvention of the university’s image, our logo was re-designed from the eerily corporate diamond to an edgier, sportier italicized “B.” Not to dis the new logo, because it certainly is very attractive and looks better, but the re-design could have easily been created by a student, allowing the school to involve the student body more fully and directly. “There’s two very opposite paradigms that I see when it comes to graphic design.” said freshman business major Austin Loomis. “There’s local paradigms, where it’s special because you can say ‘my buddy made it,’ and you’re wearing it or using ...

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“Oh, I’m sorry,” was the top response I got from anyone I talked to about living in Towers. I can kind of see what they mean—it’s around a 15 minute walk to the SUB and most days I just starve because 15 minutes is just too long. I have short legs, and they get tired easily. Like a corgi’s. But aside from the distance, I’m not really sure why anyone would be sorry for me. Towers is honestly a pretty good place to live. Sure, it’s all freshmen, but being a freshman myself, there’s really no room for me to ...

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Between 2008 and 2010 there were a total of 764 recorded crimes committed on campus. Now, that number will sound big and scary, but the reality is less than one percent of those were physical attacks. Specifically, .8 percent including sex offenses and aggravated assault. 4.5 percent were theft-related, .3 percent were arson and 1.3 percent were illegal weapons possession violations and arrests. The majority of crimes committed were alcohol and drug violations or arrests—they account for 87.9 percent of all offenses. Fittingly, students don’t seem to be too worried about being attacked on campus. They feel safe and unthreatened, ...

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Zoe Colburn is a resident freshman and Arbiter opinion writer chronicling her experiences at a new university in a new part of the country.    Having to make new friends in college is the worst. No, seriously, all I can think when I think about making friends is, “I already did this once, like seven years ago when I started middle school. Now I have to do it all over again? I call shenanigans!” But since the only other option is sitting in my dorm feeling massively sorry for myself and eating cookies by the handful while watching the entire ...

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Traveling is hard enough in the best of times, but trying to find a decently-priced flight during any holiday season is essentially the result of someone saying, “Could traveling get any harder?” and Satan himself laughing in response. The usual strategy is to buy the tickets as far in advance as possible, but many freshmen leave home completely unprepared for the spike in prices around holidays. The drive from Boise to Coeur D’Alene is nine hours, the flight is close to one. Freshman psychology major Peyton Reader has flown from Coeur D’Alene to Boise many times and usually it ends ...

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  Using art to get out a message is not a new tactic. Street artists and awareness campaigns have been doing it for years. It’s no secret why art is such a good tool for awareness, an art installation begets interest in people, where a pamphlet filled with statistics and paragraphs upon paragraphs would do just the opposite, no matter how interesting or high-priority the issue at hand. Particularly for students, some of whom barely have time to get a full eight hours of sleep, an art installation can provide the information quickly and easily. And with all the events ...

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Beyond the simple similarities in foreign policy between the two presidential candidates, foreign policy fails to interest Boise State students despite being an important issue. Foreign policy can be a dividing line between political parties, but one of the reasons the third and final presidential debate was the least watched wasn’t hard to pin-point. Despite President Barack Obama’s mega-burns and Gov. Mitt Romney’s apparent floundering, the two candidates seemed to agree on nearly everything. And foreign policy is not something that is immediately important to students. The reality is armed conflict in the Middle East is not necessarily going to ...

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The Associated Students of Boise State University (ASBSU) has been entertaining the idea of hiring a lobbyist to help in efforts to gain more equal funding from the state. In September, a Red Sky Public Relations work proposal stated, “an inequitable application of (the weighted-credit) model results in Boise State University receiving only 65 percent, or two-thirds of the amount of state funding per student.” The amount of funding Boise State gets from the state directly affects students in many ways. The most prominent being tuition rates—more state funding could mean lower tuition, while less state funding could mean higher ...

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For the Homecoming parade, Associated Students of Boise State University (ASBSU) rented 30 golf carts so student organizations could create floats. The golf carts were rented by the university to encourage and enable a greater number of organizations to participate in the parade. So far, 20 organizations have signed up for a golf cart. But was enough done to make students aware of the opportunity? To sign up, organizations could go to the Homecoming website and find the application through the Homecoming parade link on the sidebar. The deadline to apply for a golf cart was Friday Providing golf carts ...

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October is Bullying Awareness Month and as such there are some actions worth giving some thought on the subject. Bullying is one of the biggest problems our generation has had to face. The American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry reports “as many as half of all children are bullied at some time during their school years, and at least 10 percent are bullied on a regular basis.” And most people are ready for bullying coming to an end. But like everything awful in our culture, we can’t expect it to just disappear overnight by signing a mural or making ...

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Chick-fil-A has been a big deal the past couple months, so it wasn’t a surprise when they made headlines once again mid-September. As Chick-fil-A has two locations in Idaho currently, one of them being in the Boise State Student Union Building, students are keen to stay up-to-date with the philosophy carried by the chain and what they do with their money. In mid-July, Chick-fil-A president Dan Cathy said to Baptist Press he and his company were staunchly against same-sex marriage, putting the chain at the center of a whirlwind culture war resulting in boycotts and anti-boycotts across the country. Two ...

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