About the author  ⁄ waynehoseck

In world history, the Holocaust stands out like a horrible scar. Perhaps no singular event has  impacted the  world as heavily. The current generation is fortunate for the opportuniry to learn from the horrors of the Holocaust directly from a first-person perspective—learning about it from a person who lived through it. Marion Blumenthal Lazan is one of those people. On Tuesday, Marion spoke in the Special Events Center about her acclaimed memoir, “Four Perfect Pebbles: A Holocaust Story.” The expected attendance was 400 to 450 people, but about 1,000 showed up, forcing the organizers to set up folding chairs on ...

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Well it is finally here. The end. The semester starts off with jolly students whistling and skipping to new classes, but ends with two gray weeks of mental battery at the behest of sinister professors sitting at desks, wringing their hands and laughing maniacally at their students’ suffering. No wonder these weeks are aptly named “dead” week and then, ultimately, “finals” week. Dead week sounds bad, but it can be the lesser of two evils, a time of quiet preparation for the hurricane-like torrent known as finals week. This is why the angels in the Student Involvement and Leadership center ...

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There is no real definition of a non-traditional student. It is much too broad of a term to be able to categorize. Non-traditional students include: Older students, students who did not graduate high school but got a GED, students who delayed enrollment (meaning they did not attend college right after they left high school) minority students, students considered independent and students who claim other dependents such as children. More than half of the students who attend Boise State are considered non-traditional students, around 51 percent. This puts the nontraditional student into a unique category, called a concentrated population. Over the ...

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Students are broke, really broke. With the cost of tuition, books and school supplies, how is anyone supposed to even eat? Well, if this is an issue, here is some good news: starting last month, St. Paul’s Catholic Student Center, directly across from the administration building on Joyce Street, now has a student food pantry open two days a week. In late January 2011, Ben Moore, the director of Crosswalks Campus Ministries, happened to pick up an issue of The Arbiter. In the issue was an article discussing how University of California Davis,  had begun a program called the UC ...

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While most people are focusing their attention on the presidential election, there are some who are more focused on homegrown matters–issues that are also on the ballot, effecting life right here in Idaho. One of the most popular issue being proposed are Propositions 1, 2 and 3 or the “Luna Laws.” State Superintendent of Schools Tom Luna, has been in the news a lot recently and the state is in a furor, not really knowing how to handle the giant changes Luna is calling upon for the entire Idaho school system in a reform program called “Students Come First.” Propositions ...

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On a chilly Friday afternoon, at the Boas soccer complex, the girls soccer team came out against a tough conference opponent Nevada. Before the game started, the team and fans wished a fond farewell to the senior players, as it was their last regular season game as Broncos. Ebie Harris, Megan Blanchard, Brianne Favatella, Erica Parks, Brandy Hickcox, Janelle Jin and Mandy Nader were the acknowledged seniors. The game started out slow, with both teams fighting for a foothold, or a chance to score. Boise State had more shots in the first half, at 11, but out of Nevada’s seven ...

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On Tuesday night, President Barack Obama and Gov. Mitt Romney of Massachusetts carried out their second presidential debate. This debate was “town hall” style, which means the questions were chosen by 82 uncommitted voters and asked to the presidential candidates by the voters themselves. A wide variety of topics were covered, from the sluggish economy to each candidate’s position on fuel. Unlike the last debate, Obama came out in full force, directly attacking Romney throughout the debate on his five-point plan and his fuel proposals. Romney, rather than defend himself, retorted with like-minded attacks, blaming Obama’s administration for the economic ...

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It all started with an idea—South Junior High 8th grade reading teacher Yoli Gonzalez’s class had just finished a civil rights unit where they read S.E. Hinton’s acclaimed novel “The Outsiders.” Many of the students had prior experiences with bullying, both in and out of school. The students wanted to do something that would help change things, not just in their school, but in their world. This was the beginning of what is now known as the Paw Out Bullying Club (South’s mascot is the bobcat), started by the students. The club doesn’t just teach about bullying, or why bullying ...

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