About the author  ⁄ Suzanne Craig

Suzanne Craig

Suzanne Craig is a senior majoring in mathematics and is an online editor for The Arbiter. She recently returned from studying abroad in Sweden.

Transportation and Parking sent out an email parking advisory regarding the Lady Antebellum concert on March 12. Beginning at 2 p.m. there will be restrictions on entering the West Stadium Lot, but cars already located in the lot will not be required to relocate. It is recommended students take the 7 p.m. concert and resulting delays and traffic into account when planning their commute tomorrow. Doors open at 6 p.m. For information regarding parking fees for concert attendees, see the Transportation and Parking website. ...

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Students in STEM (Science Technology Engineering Mathematics) are invited to attend an internship and resume workshop on December 4 at 4 p.m in the Simplot Ballroom. Though this workshop is specifically designed for STEM majors, it is open to all. There will be a panel of students experienced with obtaining internships, professionals from around the Treasure Valley area and professors available to answer questions and give tips on networking and creating a stand-out resume and application. Also up for discussion are research opportunities and internships available for students at all levels of education. More information is available from the STEM ...

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Transportation and Parking Services sent out an alert regarding residential parking for the Thanksgiving break. Residential permit holders are authorized to park in their usual areas for the week of Thanksgiving, but surface lot permit holders will have the option to move to a garage for the week. Which one can you move into? Lincoln Parking Garage: Lincoln Townhouses Residential (LTR) and West Stadium Resident Hall (RH) permit holders can move to the fourth floor (4000 number stalls) and above. Brady Parking Garage: Barnes Tower (BR) and Brady Garage Residential (BGR) permit holders can move their cars to the third ...

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Courtesy Boise State Update. The Idaho Review at Boise State University has announced the winners of the 2013 Idaho Review Fiction Contest. 1st Prize, “Tough Love” by Janet Peery 2nd Prize, “Jubilee” by Caleb Johnson 3rd Prize, “Memorial Day” by Emily Sproch First-prize winner Peery has had works published in many literary journals, including Southern Review, The Kenyon Review, Shenandoah and Black Warrior Review. Her stories have been included in The Best American Short Stories, The Pushcart Prize and The Best of the Pushcart Prize. Her novel, “The River Beyond the World,” was a finalist for the National Book Award in ...

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Homecoming is a busy week for everyone and for people with parking permits on campus it’s a great time to get a ticket. There are advisories out for every parking permit issued by the Boise State Transportation and Parking office, as well as general street closures to look forward to this weekend. Here are some of the ones more likely to impact students: General Permit: Lots near the stadium (full list available on the Transportation and Parking website) are closed at midnight on Friday. All vehicles left behind will be towed and cited at owner’s expense. Alternative parking options are ...

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General parking permit holders might have some trouble getting parking Thursday October 10 and Saturday October 12. An event at the Stueckle Sky Center will shut down the West Stadium Lot 6 a.m.-3 p.m. on Thursday. The East Stadium Lot will remain open, along with the other General Permit areas, but will be impacted, so it would be a good idea to plan to arrive a little earlier than usual. All day Saturday the West Stadium General Permit Area will be closed, as well as the Bronco Circle, due to the DIII Music Festival. Any vehicles left in these areas ...

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Courtesy Kathleen Tuck, Boise State Update. Dale Brown, a graduate student in the Boise State University Department of Materials Science and Engineering, is the recipient of a Nuclear Materials Fellowship funded by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The award supports the first year of study by a science or engineering graduate student. The purpose of the fellowship is to support development of a workforce with technical expertise in nuclear science and engineering and related technical fields. Recipients agree to work in a nuclear-related field for a specified period of time following graduation. Brown earned two bachelor’s degrees from Northwest Nazarene University in 2010, ...

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Studying abroad is a great experience in itself, but having something to remember it with is equally important. For one, it lets you remember and even keep in touch with all those friends you made. For another, it gives you something material to wave in your little sister’s face to make her jealous. Some of the most popular are various methods of journaling. There’s the physical option, especially useful for those artistic types who can keep sketches next to the appropriate passages. It also makes for a scrapbook type of memoranda, with ticket stubs and receipts. The tech option is ...

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“Slow down!” Meliha Kaya, of Turkey, said. This phrase is uttered on an almost daily basis in our apartment. The tendency to talk fast and slur words together is one common to anyone speaking their native language, though it is apparently particularly prevalent in Americans. “You have what people think of as an American accent,” Timothy Daniel, French, said. “You talk fast.” A lot of misunderstandings can be avoided with proper enunciation and slowing it down. This is obvious to anyone who has tried to learn a use a different language with a native speaker, but it is very difficult ...

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Encountering stereotypes is an inevitable part of meeting new people. Meeting new people from other countries just means there are more stereotypes to work through and be aware of. For Americans, there are two big stereotypes to be aware of. First, Americans are stupid. This one is interesting because I have yet to encounter it directly, but I have been asked if I have had any problems with people who believe this stereotype. This implies one of two things: either people are aware that the stereotype is a ridiculous overgeneralization so no one actually believes it, or I have a ...

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Spring in Sweden can be a bit odd. Grass is green, wild flowers started popping up and the lakes are still frozen over and valid pedestrian shortcuts. Strange weather patterns aside, spring means something more to students. It means the semester is starting to wrap up. For exchange students most are finishing their eschange program at the end of this term and need to start preparing to go home. Keeping track of two sets of academic deadlines is a bit of a hassle. Preparing a schedule for the fall semester is annoyingly difficult if you don’t know for certain what ...

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Last year’s Breaking News Editor Suzanne Craig chronicles her adventures while studying abroad in Sweden.   Traveling gets expensive fast, especially to tourist hotspots like Lapland. Options for cheap places to stay are scarce in the remote northern regions of Scandinavia. Luckily, the local chapter of Erasmus needed someone to coordinate with the travel agency. For ten hours of labor and a willingness to help count heads on buses, I got all my expenses paid. All expenses and all additional excursions were covered by the travel agency, Timetravels, so long as I could sell 20 tickets. Those tickets sold themselves, ...

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Hindsight is 20-20, making decisions and reactions which were perfectly sensible at the time foolish and embarrassing. Before taking the plunge into studying abroad, learn from others’ experiences and relish in avoiding some missteps. 1—It’s not all sunshine and rainbows. As much fun as studying abroad is, being across an ocean from friends and family can be hard. “Sometimes you do just sit in your apartment and feel sad and lonely,” Rikke Holm, of Denmark, said. This reality can be circumvented with careful application of Skype conversations, sugar and party trolling. Keeping busy really is the best treatment to homesickness ...

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People make the trip. Many a marvelous vacation has been ruined by poor traveling companions, so it’s not surprising that otherwise dull stretches of a journey will be made more memorable if the right people are around to help. Bus travel from country to country has both a novelty and cheapness factor going for it. It also makes for very long, dull periods where all you can really do is sleep. Thankfully for my insomnia, a long stretch from Copenhagen to Hamburg was filled with chatter and iPod games thanks to Somali seatmate, Abrahim. Striking up a conversation at the bus ...

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“Get involved” is the mantra of any college or high school advisor. “Set foot on campus and become fresh meat for clubs and organizations that need new suckers to do heavy lifting” is a little long to fit on motivational posters. The mantra stays in the background, like those ‘buy shirts’ songs that play in Kohl’s, but it never quite leaves. After nobly resisting, the boredom of the previous semester fueled a desperate application for a Växjö International Students board member position, which I got. New suckers? Check. Did I get some heavy lifting or tedious jobs shoved onto me? ...

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Valentine’s Day, considered to be a true Hallmark holiday, is overshadowed by other traditions in Sweden. The beginning of Lent this February makes the presence of the semla pastry in bakeries a must, and these cream filled pastries draw more attention than the heart-filled holiday. Instead of overflowing greeting card stocks stacked high with chocolate roses and flowers, the grocery store closest to campus, ICA, has one small rack of cards placed near the candy aisle. Few people even give the rack of cards a passing glance, even the day before Valentine’s Day, or, as it is called in Sweden, Alla hjärtans dag. Directly ...

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Going to the movies with friends is a classic past-time, even when the movies are in a different language and the subtitles leave a lot to be desired. Somehow, Swedish students manage to justify spending a ridiculous amount of money every time they go to the cinema, leading to cringing disbelief on others’ parts. Each ticket costs 120 kroner, or 20 dollars. There aren’t any cheaper options, like matinee tickets, either. Shelling out that much money every once and a while might be all right, but seeing a movie a month is definitely not in the cards. Unfortunate, with how ...

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An interesting trend in Sweden is recycling drop machines at grocery stores which accept certain plastic, aluminum and glass items. After tallying the refund amount the machines spit out a receipt which is turned in to the cashier for cash or to be put towards any purchases made. The ease of access and immediacy of savings make this a top option for students looking to save a little. Another option is to save up the receipts until a certain goal is reached so splurging on more luxury purchases—like ice cream—doesn’t dip directly into the food-fund. Even more convenient than the ...

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Three years ago there was a big fuss over a small-time country singer who made a shirt out of an American flag. Words like disrespect and treason were bandied about. Apparently, no one in Europe cared about that story, as nearly every clothes store has something with an American flag based pattern on it. Tank-tops, sweaters, scarves—I have seen more people wearing American flag-based merchandise in Sweden than I ever did in the States! This is a common fad in Europe, my Polish friend assured me as she showed off her American flag print bag. Here I was, thinking my ...

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The stereotypical tourist, clicking away on an oversized camera while wearing a Hawaiian print shirt and sandals with socks, can be found anywhere. Maybe the Hawaiian shirt is traded in for an obnoxiously Swedish sweater, and the sandals are garishly colored rubber boots, but the principle is the same: Becoming a classic tourist, being willing to have yourself branded as an outsider from the moment you set foot off the train, takes a certain kind of courage. Taking part in tourist-traps, particularly parting with obscene amounts of money for some useless trinket, makes me break out in metaphorical hives. Clicking ...

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Asking about majors is a staple of college introductions. In an exchange-heavy university most initial conversations can be put into three categories: majors, countries and why Sweden. Depending on the differences in native languages, a fourth category on pronouncing your name properly can also be added. Majors such as international business administration and teaching are the most common. Then come various language studies or, my personal favorite, peace and development studies. When asked, students of peace and development seem to all be planning on solving world hunger and curing AIDs, before retiring to work at an embassy in a war-torn ...

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Last year’s Breaking News Editor Suzanne Craig chronicles her adventures while studying abroad in Sweden. Food is more expensive in Sweden than in the U.S. It’s hard to notice at first due to the currency conversion rate being so high, but after a few weeks the pinch to the pocketbook gets noticeable. This leads to money-saving efforts. Walking instead of taking the bus, remembering to bring reusable bags instead of paying two kroner for a plastic bag when you shop, small things like that. Another idea was to get a job. Getting a job in a foreign country where you ...

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One would think, being on the other side of the planet and all, it would be difficult to get a hold of the current presidential debates. If only it were so. Instead, escaping the presidential debates and the exclamations of “oh but you’re an American, what do you think?” requires an intimate knowledge of the bus-system and a talent for dodging the question. If dodging the question requires throwing another American to the wolves, so be it. Politics is a dirty game. Two weeks ago I received an e-mail asking for an interview regarding American politics and the presidential elections ...

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Running around to different parks to play around on their swing-sets and jungle-gyms may not have been the most dignified and mature way to spend a Friday afternoon. The fun from comparing Swedish children’s parks to American ones and trying to figure out their strange merry-go-round was worth every weird look though. “This was the best idea ever, thanks for coming,” Monica Mendoza, exchange student from San Francisco, said. Turns out we had both been tempted by a weird circular swing-set, but lack of interest from our friends kept us from exploring. After all, the idea of sober college students ...

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Last years’s Breaking News Editor Suzanne Craig chronicles her adventures while studying abroad in Sweden. Student discounts are pretty common, but going on trips managed by student organizations aren’t necessarily such a good deal. Depending on the trip you could end up spending more than if you had gone by yourself or with some friends while not being able to spend your time however you want and instead following a set schedule. Some trips are worth it though, so research ahead of time is a good idea. Unless you are one of those lucky people who can fling money at ...

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