About the author  ⁄ Christina Marfice

Christina Marfice

Christina Marfice is the features editor for The Arbiter. She is also a freelance feature writer for Boise Weekly. She is a grammar snob and loves reading good books. Follow her on twitter @ChristinaMarf

Fact check: Do you know what kind of student loans you have? If you’re like many Boise State students, you might have some vague ideas but aren’t sure of the specifics. Considering that almost 25,000 students took loans last year, that’s a lot of people unsure of their financial future. There are some big differences between the multiple types of loans available to students attending Boise State, including Federal Unsubsidized loans, Perkins Loans, Parent Plus Loans and private loans through banks. According to the Boise State Financial Aid Handbook, a Federal Subsidized Stafford Loan is the smartest option, in several ...

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This month, The Arbiter is getting all the deets on student loans. Comment on this article, post on our facebook, or tweet us your questions about your financial aid, and we’ll answer them here. Here are the questions we’ve received so far, with answers provided by Diana Fairchild, Interim Director of Financial Aid, and Maureen Sigler, Senior Financial Aid Counselor. 1.     When is the deadline for finalizing financial aid for the semester? If you are referring to spring semester, the financial aid needs to be “disbursed” or routed through your BroncoWeb account before the last day of classes … with only ...

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In June 2010, the nation-wide total student loan debt exceeded total credit card debt for the first time in history. The figure for outstanding student loan debt in the United States increases by nearly $3,000 per second. Grants and scholarships have not increased enough to keep up with the rising cost of tuition, forcing more students into crippling debt every semester. We know the numbers—more than $1 trillion in national debt—but do we fully understand the emotional toll debt can take on students? Alexandria Hughes, a double major in math and biology, sought the advice of a counselor last summer ...

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Like so many other Boise State students, Elizabeth Silva, a junior nursing major, stumbled upon Boise State Confessions last week. The Facebook page was filled with the dirtiest secrets Boise State students could think to share, and like so many others, Silva scrolled through them, laughing, gasping and gagging at other students’ deepest, darkest confessions. Then, Silva saw her own name mentioned in a post written by a secret admirer from one of her classes. “I was in shock at first,” Silva said. “I though there was no way it could be real. I have absolutely no idea who posted ...

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The first day of the year rang in more than resolutions this year–with the new year came some of Boise’s coldest temperatures so far this winter. Just how c-c-cold was Boise during winter break? Jan. 4 saw a recorded low of just 4 degrees Fahrenheit. For nearly the duration of the intersession class term, Boise’s daily high temperatures hovered at 15-20 degrees below normal; many days, the temperature barely reached two digits. The well-below-freezing temperatures and a heavier-than-average snowfall combined to make campus a winter wonderland for those Broncos lucky enough to be enrolled in classes over break. But while most of ...

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Semesters go by pretty quickly, don’t they? In the proverbial blink of an eye, December is here and finds us scrambling to finish projects and papers, to study for finals and to prepare for a long holiday season with friends and family. Maybe you’re graduating this week, and if so, congratulations! Maybe you’ve had a really great semester. You have awesome grades and you’re proud of your effort. Maybe you’re really looking forward to another semester just like this one. Maybe this semester hasn’t been your best. You’ve struggled with balancing your school and social life. Combining a heavy course ...

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As the semester draws to a close, let’s take a look back at some of the top stories from the last five months:   1. Religious preacher tackled on campus: 2,080 page views Campus was buzzing after a frustrated student tackled a preacher on the quad. A vocal altercation between the preacher, Ken Fleck, and the student escalated until the student grabbed Fleck and forced him to the ground. “I’m sorry it happened. I forgive the man that did that to me,” Fleck said. “But I mean, Jesus said that you will be hated by all for his namesake, he ...

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When one of my classes required that I read several classic novels, it seemed to be a perfect opportunity to take my new Kindle for a spin. Not only were the e-book versions more convenient, not even requiring me to leave bed in order to purchase my texts, but they cost less than print editions. Win-win, right? Unfortunately, wrong. As I began to read, I realized that the Kindle versions of the literature I was reading were not the same as they might be in traditional print. At first, I only noticed a misplaced comma here, or an incorrectly spelled ...

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In the context of a college education, four years is an eternity. In terms of a presidency, it passes in the blink of an eye. Last week, Barack Obama won the presidency and, with it, four more years to shape our country. Supporters of the president have high hopes for what he may accomplish during his second term, but what goals can we realistically expect him to meet with a time limit looming in only four short years? Students and professors alike expressed a wide range of what they deemed the most important issues for the president to tackle during ...

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In less than one week, our country will choose a leader. The road to Nov. 6 has been long and difficult, dirtied by the mud-slinging campaign tactics of both the Democratic and Republican Party. It’s the same story we hear every four years—many Americans have become so disenchanted with both candidates they express their vote as being simply for the “lesser of two evils.” It is fairly standard practice in journalism for a newspaper’s editorial staff to endorse one candidate over the other. In recent weeks, prominent papers across the U.S. have come out in support of Mitt Romney or ...

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A street corner on Franklin Road near the mall Sunday afternoon drew stares, waves, insults and rude gestures from passing motorists as a man and his wife held a large blue and orange sign reading “Abortions kill baby broncos.” First Congressional District candidate Pro-Life and his wife, Kirsten Richardson, said they received reactions ranging from smiles to middle fingers. They say the sign is not affiliated with Pro-Life’s congressional campaign. “We’re just trying to save babies,” Richardson said. Pro-Life has run for seats on the state legislature, United States Senate and now Congress and has made two unsuccessful bids for ...

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It’s getting chilly at night. Boots and scarves are starting to reappear on campus. Pumpkin spice is back at every campus coffee location. Summer is over and all the signs are already here that fall is in full swing—for further proof, just listen to the coughing and sniffling all around you in class. College is a hot zone for upper respiratory illnesses like common colds and flus. Students are in close quarters with one another at nearly all times and it stands to reason a person exposed to so many highly contagious illnesses day-to-day stands a heavy risk of contracting ...

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Boise police are investigating a shooting that took place in downtown Boise early Sunday morning. A single shot was fired on the southeast corner of Capitol and Main at about 1:15 a.m. Sunday morning, a time when downtown streets are packed with weekend partiers. The shooting is believed to be gang related. By the time Boise police arrived on the scene, two suspects and one victim had fled on foot. No one was seriously injured in the incident, but a 37-year-old victim from Twin Falls was treated for a gunshot wound to the leg and later released from a Boise ...

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