Community Cinema: Medora

The documentary “Medora” takes place in Medora, Ind. and focuses on the once great high school basketball team, the Medora Hornets, and their struggle to compete with consolidated schools nearby that have greater
resources and more students.

“(This film is) a revealing look into a group of young men who refuse to give up,” said Ron Pisaneschi, the general manager of Idaho Public Television.

The film follows the community for a year and a half, putting struggles with poverty, forgiveness and dropping out into a new light.

“(“Medora”) is not just a basketball film; it’s about life,” said Marcia Franklin, the moderator of the Idaho Public Television screening.

The discussion led after the film turned Medora into a symbol for pride within small towns. By forcing students to pay for after-school activities many viewers felt that it was detracting from the already few options that low income students have.

In a study done by the Center on Budget Policies and Priorities between 2007- 2012 Idaho cut education spending per student 19 percent.

“When you got to cut $300,000 out of a school, you definitely have money problems,” said Mike Schroeder, a coach at Emmett High School.

In the school year of 2006-2007 Idaho spent roughly $377 per student putting it at the third lowest per student budget in the west half of the United States just below those of Utah and Arizona.

“Medora” is  directed by Andrew Cohn and Davy Rothbart and made by Independent Television Service (ITVS) for the television show “Independent Lens” which airs every Monday on PBS. Idaho Public Television will also be pairing with “Independent Lens” to put on “The New Black,” a film about gay rights within the African American community in Maryland. “The New Black” will be screening at Idaho Public Television, 1455 N Orchard St., Boise on May 7 at 7 p.m.

About the author  ⁄ patriciabowen