The best cheesy sci-fi

The best cheesy sci-fi

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THX 1138 (1971)

 

Robert Duvall stars as THX 1138 in George Lucas’ directorial debut.  The citizens in this dystopian future wear white and the men, as well as the women, sport shaved heads.  Get past this bleak monochromatic world and the reality sets in.  To make sure there is no deviation from the norm, the citizens are under constant surveillance by cameras and android police.  Mandatory drugs are used to keep the populous from feeling extreme emotions such as love.  THX decides to escape when the city council decides he needs to be “disposed of.”

 

 

Avalanche Sharks (2013)

 

College students invade the ski resort town of Twin Pines during spring break.  Prehistoric sharks are released from a long frozen sleep during an avalanche caused by a snowmobile.  The snowmobiler only whetted the sharks’ appetites and the prehistoric monsters set off to the smorgasbord waiting for them at the resort.  Stereotypes abound from the bikini-clad co-eds (who cares if there’s snow on the ground, we’ll have a bikini contest!), the old geezer warning of impending doom, to the sheriff forced to organize the vacationers to take down the sharks.

 

 

Cube 2: Hypercube (2002)

 

Eight strangers wake up in a six-panel room with no memories of how they got there.  Each side has doors leading to other cubes.  Nothing is as it seems, from the people thrown together to the empty rooms.  Each room provides a new horror to over come as they try to escape their prison.  Some traps are odd, like the rooms that speeds up or slow down time.  In another, a floating square appears and shreds a member of the group.  In the end, it’s not the elaborate traps they have to watch out for, but each other.

 

 

Equilibrium (2002)

 

The stylization and action of “The Matrix” meets “THX 1138,” but told from the oppressors’ point of view.  Christian Bale stars as John Preston, an officer in the Grammaton Cleric.  He tracks down “sense offenders,” those who refuse to take the emotion-numbing drug Prozia II and indulge in art and literature that stimulate feelings.  Upon finding an offender hiding the original Mona Lisa, Preston coldly says, “Burn it.”  He upholds his duties until he misses his daily dose and starts feeling emotions.  Visually stunning with incredible choreographed shootouts breathes new life into the Orwellian society concept.