Quarter Life Crisis Reading List

Quarter Life Crisis Reading List

I read somewhere once that all great books should be read three times; in the beginning of life, the middle and toward the end. Each time the book’s meaning will evolve and readers will be able to take different lessons and see aspects of the novel in a new light. As an avid reader myself, I compiled a list of seven books every 20-something should indulge themselves in.

“The Sun Also Rises”

Now, I might be biased because Hemingway is one of my favorite authors, but this book is one that lost souls will find comfort in. In a nutshell, it’s Hemingway’s snapshot of 1920s Paris. But as a reader in her early 20s and not entirely sure where my life is going at the moment, I relished in the fact that the main character was on the same kind of soul search as I am.

“The Great Gatsby”

I mean, who doesn’t want to read about wild parties and hopeless love?

If you’ve already read it for school, I recommend reading it on your own and taking the story for what it is without an instructor or classmates telling you what you should be taking from the novel.

“How to Lose Friends and Alienate People”

I confess, I haven’t read all the way through this one just yet. But so far, so good. It’s definitely a more modern tale than the previously mentioned two, but still tells the story of trying to adjust to new places and faces.

“The Secret Life of Bees”

Going right along with the theme of finding yourself, this novel is about searching for answers in unexpected places, and discovering you may not have really wanted the answer. I have read this book twice, and will probably read it again.

“The Grimm Fairy Tales”

Barnes and Noble has an awesome collection of the original Grimm Fairy Tales. Honestly, everyone should know that in the original stories, even the Disney princesses didn’t get their happy endings.

“The Giver and 1984”

If you liked the “Hunger Games,” then you should definitely read these two classics. A friendly reminder that utopia can go so wrong and that a little distrust of the government can sometimes be advisable.