Afro-Black Student Alliance celebrates Black History Month

Afro-Black Student Alliance celebrates Black History Month

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February is Black History Month, and for one club on campus, the month is more than just a chance to remember those who suffered and fought for simple human rights.

The Afro-Black Student Association, formerly known as the Black Student Alliance, is hosting an event on campus on Feb. 24, aimed at raising awareness about their organization, and of the origins of African descendants.

Emmanuel Eze, a sophomore accounting major and president of the Afro-Black Student Association, encourages students of all backgrounds to become involved in the organization.

“You don’t have to be black to join. Everyone is welcome,” Eze said.

As an international student from Nigeria, Eze became involved in the Afro-Black Student Alliance in 2013 after the organization was formed.

Eze feels that students should learn about not only their heritage, but of others as well.

“Black History Month is only celebrated in the U.S., Canada and the U.K. It isn’t celebrated where I’m from because, well, every month is Black History Month,” Eze said.

According to the Library of Congress, Carter G. Woodson founded “Negro History Week” in 1925, though first celebrated in 1926, as February “encompassed the birthdays of both Abraham Lincoln and Frederick Douglass.”

During the nation’s bicentennial in 1976, President Gerald Ford pleaded with Americans “to seize the opportunity to honor the too-often neglected accomplishments of black Americans in every area of endeavor throughout our history.”

Since 1976, every American president has issued African American History Month
proclamations.

From 7 to 9 p.m. on Feb. 24 events will include an “Open Mic,” which Eze hopes will be used by the Boise State community to share stories, poems, and songs that incorporate African heritage.

“Students do not need to be of African heritage to participate, just have something they want to share,” Eze said.

Renowned motivational speaker, Vincent Kitunku of Kenya, will serve as the keynote speaker.

According to his personal website, “Dr. Kituku, a native of Kenya, Africa, draws on his rich cultural heritage and his in-depth experience in corporate America to help others apply the strategies of personal and professional success to their lives.”

For more information about the event, visit the club’s Facebook page.

All students who are interested in learning about the Afro-Black Student Alliance are encouraged to attend weekly meetings held Thursdays at 3:30 p.m. on the second floor of the SUB, in front of the Student Leadership
Center.