There is a new addition to the Special Events Center (SPEC) Gallery, the artwork  of artist Kathleen Probst.

There are seven pieces of art which make up the exhibit. “Kurva” by Kathleen Probst is unique to some of the other works of art seen around campus because she is a fabric artist. Her pieces are hand-dyed fabrics with colorful and attention-grabbing design.

On her website, Probst says, “Art came to me in life much like everything else. I stumbled upon it, became obsessed and fit it in with all the other plates I have spinning in my life.”

In mixing shapes and colors on textiles, some of the designs are jarring, the shapes and colors of her works are shaped with deliberate precision.

“Constantly I catch myself surveying my surroundings to find patterns and relationships of space. River rocks, architecture, leaves, car designs and other art, like children’s book illustrations, inspire me,” Probst said. “I have a background in math and I crave strong spatial relationships in my work to create simplicity and balance.”

The works have been on display since Jan. 18 and will be on display until Jun. 13.

Students and faculty will have all semester to view the artwork. However, there will be a two hour reception for the new art on Jan. 30 from 4:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. where the pieces are located in the Student Union Building.

“Each piece I make teaches me something new and tells me where to go next. Two years ago I began hand dyeing my own fabric, which make up my own signature palette that you will find in both series,” Probst said.

Art and shapes aren’t just a job or a hobby for Probst, though. It is her life, where her everyday life meshes with her passion.

“I am on a path of simplicity and minimalism. I have a strong and instantaneous reaction to the spatial relationships of all the objects I see. I find myself constantly scrutinizing the proportion, pattern and complexity of shape,” Probst said. “Currently my work is to explore spatial relationships using curved lines and my signature shapes. My aim is to create simple, elegant compositions that are with filled with complexities not noticed at first glance.”

These pieces give students the opportunity to look deeper into things seen everywhere, and assigning them a deeper meaning.

For more information on ‘Kurva’ and the reception for the art, visit finearts.boisestate.edu.

If interested in looking up more on Kathleen Probst and her works of art, visit her website: Kathleenprobst.com

Madison Killian
Madison Killian is the assistant Arts & Entertainment editor for the Arbiter, and a junior at Boise State majoring in Communications. She enjoys loud rock music, coffee and long walks on the beach. When she isn't jet setting around campus or interviewing your favorite band, she enjoys spending time with her pets: a dog named Jake and a cat named after Janis Joplin.