New college application questions encourage creative thinking

New college application questions encourage creative thinking

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“So where is Waldo,
really?”

That’s not the kind of question most high school seniors expect to find on their college admission applications. But it is one of the essay options that applicants to the University of Chicago face this year in their quest for a coveted freshman berth.

It is the kind of mind-stretching, offbeat or downright freaky essay question that is becoming more common these days as colleges and universities seek to pierce the fog of students’ traditional self-aggrandizing essays detailing their accomplishments and hardships.

From Caltech in the West to Wake Forest University in the East, more schools are serving up unusual essay prompts to gain better insights into young people’s minds and personalities. Colleges also hope for more authenticity in a process skewed by parental intrusion, paid coaching and plagiarism.

“It’s a way to see students who can think differently and go beyond their academic, intellectual and extracurricular comfort zones,” said Garrett Brinker, an admissions official at University of Chicago. Those essays also “break up the monotony of the application process,” for students and colleges.

The Common Application, the online site used by 488 colleges, offers such generic prompts as: “Discuss some issue of personal, local, national or international concern and its importance to you.”

The site makes it easier for would-be students to apply, even if some are half-hearted about enrolling. But an increasing number of schools prefer to hear only from serious applicants “aware of the values of the institution,” said Katy Murphy, president-elect of the National Association for College Admission Counseling.

So more colleges are adding online supplements that require head-scratching writing assignments.

Examples include Tufts’ “Celebrate your nerdy side”; Wake Forest’s “Think of things that fascinated you when you were 10 years old; what has endured?”; Caltech’s “Please describe an unusual way in which you have fun”; and Brandeis’ “A package arrives at your door. After seeing the contents you know it’s going to be the best day of your life. What’s inside and how do you spend
your day?”

For some students, the questions may lighten an otherwise burdensome task. But others are intimidated, said Murphy, who is college counseling director at Bellarmine College Preparatory, a high school in San Jose, Calif.

“The colleges talk about the creativity of play and the philosophy of Plato. What the students are trying to figure out is: ‘What do the colleges want me to say?’ “

Judy Rothman, author of “The Neurotic Parent’s Guide to College Admissions,” said schools like curveball essay questions because “they are sick and tired of reading the same thing over and over again” and because the topics encourage teen authorship without adult coaching.High school seniors have mixed reactions, she said: “For a kid who is natural writer, it is relief and a great break from the tedious process of the applications. For the kids who just want to get through all their applications, it’s a nightmare because you can’t recycle
material.”

Hannah Kohanzadeh, a Santa Monica High School senior, has embraced the trend. “So many schools don’t pay attention to the little quirks students have. Those personal things can tell whether a student belongs there or not,” she said.

With deadlines days away, she is finishing applications to Brandeis, Occidental and others. For Occidental, an essay asked: “Identify and describe a personal habit or idiosyncrasy  of any nature that helps define you.”

She wrote about how she flaps her arms when she gets excited about hearing good music or reading a great book, and tied it to her love of new ideas.

“I start flying,” she said.

For idiosyncrasies, other students described being so rushed that they brush their teeth in the shower, wearing certain underwear as a good luck charm for exams and falling in love too fast, according to Occidental’s Dean of Admission Sally Stone Richmond.

Inviting such revelations helps ease applicants’ fears that they must appear perfect and is “an opportunity to seek candor in ways that won’t be intimidating to the student,” she said.