The Broncos got Herpes and class

The Broncos got Herpes and class

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The addictive Facebook page that once kept our attention span off our studies and on the anonymous posts by students has been reinstated for the third time.

Bronco Confessions is again allowing a frenzy of Facebook users to air their dirty laundry. Using a third-party survey generator, students anonymously admit their secret crushes, detail dirty deeds they committed in the library (be careful of what you touch on the fourth floor!) and reveal they have contracted STDs on campus—especially herpes. From the sounds of it, Boise State has a herpes problem.

According to Sandra Hellman with University Health Services, “herpes is not a reportable infection so there are no statistics on herpes at Boise State. However, genital herpes infection is common in the U.S. Nationwide, 16.2 percent, or about one out of six people aged 14 to 49 years have genital HSV-2 infection.”

Apply this statistic to Boise State: out of 22,000 students, 3,520 could potentially have herpes.

Are Boise State students taking enough precaution against preventing herpes?

According to some posts, students aren’t alerting their sexual partners about their STDs. Confession #4 on Bronco Confessions claims, “I have herpes and i’m not gonna tell anyone about it. haha” and confession #33 states “I don’t tell people I have sex with that I have an STD.”

If you’re ignorant and repulsive enough not to care about the health of your sexual partners, you shouldn’t be having sex. Andy Bernard from the popular television show “The Office” said it best when he said, “I was an RA in college and I can tell you, number one sexually transmitted disease is ignorance.”

Wouldn’t you want a partner to alert you of his or her STD before sex?

Some students are voicing their concerns about the posts being made on the site.

Confession #156 claims “I am officially scared to have sex with anyone from (Boise State) due to all the STD’s being posted about.”

Students need take precaution against these scumbag lowlifes by educating themselves of not only the dangers of contracting herpes, but its lifelong effects.

“There is no treatment that can cure herpes,” Hellman said, quoting the Centers for Disease Control guide for clinicians. “People get herpes by having sex with someone who has the disease.  Having sex means anal, vaginal, or oral sex.”

Using protection isn’t always a safeguard.

“Correct and consistent use of latex condoms can reduce the risk of genital herpes, but does not eliminate the risk of transmission,” Hellman said. “Herpes symptoms can still occur in both male and female genital areas that are covered or protected by latex condoms.  Also, outbreaks can occur in areas that are not covered by a condom.”

This means you need to know who you’re sleeping with and their sexual history since infection can occur even with a condom.

Though it may be uncomfortable to bring up, it’s more comfortable than taking antiviral medication everyday and explaining to future partners that you were stupid enough to have sex without knowing your partner had an STD.

University Health Services encourages individuals who believe they may have an STD, including herpes, to make a confidential appointment by calling
426-1459.