Art serves as utility for film

Art serves as utility for film

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The Arbiter

Looking for a way to have your photos viewed, your poems and short stories read or your illustrations eyed? Campus Canvas, a new outlet for creatively inclined Broncos, is seeking submissions in the categories of poetry, photography, illustration and more. Prefer to think outside the box; Send us a photo of your non-traditional art including sculpture, graffiti, fashion design or anything artistic.

Art and writing submissions will be reviewed by the editorial staff and if your piece is chosen, your work will be featured in the print edition of The Arbiter along with an artist bio. Please send submissions or questions/comments about Campus Canvas to arts@stumedia.boisestate.edu.

As a young child in her church, Aubry Hollingshead, junior communication major with an emphasis in media production, would sit sketching for hours as adults attended scripture and toddlers preoccupied themselves with Cheerios and children’s games.

“When you’re a little kid you don’t really take an interest in rambling religious speeches,” Hollingshead said. “So, I would just draw the whole time, that’s where I got started. Then I would draw a lot in school and teachers would get all stoked on my artwork so I kept doing it.”

As Hollingshead’s art developed, her talents were recognized and rewarded.

While attending high school in Utah, Hollingshead won the Sterling Scholar Award for visual arts. This award is granted to top performers within 13 academic subjects.

“I largely got that one based on my sketch books and my portraiture,”Hollingshead said.  “I won region for that, so over the course of that school year I had my work published in pretty much every newspaper between Ogden and Salt Lake.”

Hollingshead’s art was also featured at the Springville Museum of Art and Bountiful Davis Art Center in conjunction with high school exhibits.When it comes to subject matter, Hollingshead combines an initial idea with inspirations from other artwork.

Her recent drawing, “Germ Girl,” is a portrait of her friend Kayla mixed with elements of renaissance art, namely the halo-like look surrounding her portrait.

This was inspired by a trip to the National Gallery of Art in D.C.Instances from her own life also drive Hollingshead’s artwork.

One of Hollingshead’s works depicts two women in a power struggle, one smothering the other with her body, and deals with feelings she had after a two year involvement with roller derby.

“At the time I was kind of on my way out of roller derby, which is this really intense female subculture full of strong personalities that often don’t mix well,” Hollingshead said. “I don’t have an especially dominant personality and by the time I retired, I had felt completely smothered by the women around me for a very long time. It was enormously frustrating.”

According to Hollingshead, her angst from coming out of this situation along with a mix of other relationship circumstances at the time came out in her work.

“That one is interesting because people… depending on their gender-sometimes men will see it as a man subjugating a woman and won’t see that it is two women,” Hollingshead said.

Currently, Hollingshead favors working in charcoal as a medium or sketching in graphite and pen. She has, however, worked in a variety of mediums, including paint, plexi glass, screen printing, wood paneling, pottery, figure sculpting, wire and sheet metal.Hollingshead has recently found an interest in digital painting and plans to utilize her art to work hand in hand with her film degree.

“I do film now, so that’s pretty much where my focus is,”Hollingshead said. “My initial interest in film was in cinematography and visual effects.”

Hollingshead entered into the trade hoping to add to her visual portfolio.

“I developed an intense interest in screenwriting, directing, producing and editing,” Hollingshead said. “From there my interests evolved into a passion for everything that is film production. I see a lot of artistic opportunity for me in this industry that goes beyond drawing pretty pictures.”

 

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Tabitha Bower
Tabitha Bower is currently the Editor-in-Chief of The Arbiter. She became involved with The Arbiter after taking a News Writing class, and began by writing for both the News and Features sections as a journalist for one semester before taking a position as the Arts and Entertainment section editor. She is double majoring in English with a writing emphasis and communication with a journalism emphasis. After college she dreams of being employed in the field of journalism, traveling the world and instructing hot yoga. Tabitha is originally from a small tourist town on the coast of Maine, but has lived in multiple areas of New England, Florida, Hawaii and Okinawa, Japan. She once spent a year backpacking, scuba diving, surfing and basking in a hammock with a drink in Southeast Asia. She also has the talent of juggling school, work, looking fabulous and being super mom to her three-year-old son, Aiden.