Movie Review: ‘Project X’ simply made to entertain

COURTESY WARNER BROS.

“Project X” has been advertised as the epitome of epic party movies—claiming in previews it’s “Superbad on crack.”

Although it was entertaining to watch 88 minutes of a large-scale party, complete with a D.J., under-age drinking, nudity, drugs, angry neighbors, 12-year-old security guards, a guy with a flame-thrower and cops attempting to stop the madness, it was no “Superbad.”

Right off the bat we see Thomas, the timid birthday boy with strict parents, Costa, the cocky party planner from Queens and JB, the quiet nerd who just wants to be a part of the plan.

What else do you need to know? It’s a party movie. It’s meant to be funny and visually entertaining, not plot-driven.

There was no moral to be taken away from the film, but it’s far from a promotion to wreck a house just for the hell of it. “Project X” is meant to be an epic party audiences get to watch unfold as it gets wildly out of hand.

There are many  parallels between “Superbad” and “X.”

“Superbad” had memorable faces, characters and quotes that can be recounted endlessly after the film. Comparably, in “X,” the character Costa combines Seth (Jonah Hill) and Fogell (Christopher Mintz-Plasse) and Thomas mirrored Evan (Michael Cera).

However, Thomas and Costa’s goal of throwing the biggest party didn’t live up to Seth, Evan and Fogell’s journey of buying alcohol for their “last party as high school people.”

Many people couldn’t see the meaning of “Project X,” but low and behold, it doesn’t have one.

It wasn’t made to win an Oscar—it was made to be entertaining. Audiences watch as three high school seniors throw a progressively out-of-control birthday party for Thomas to make a name for themselves.

And their conflict is simple: avoid getting caught by Thomas’ parents at all costs while throwing the biggest party of all time.

The audience members find themselves rooting for Thomas and his friends to pull off their stunt as 1,500 people filter into Thomas’ house.

Other sub-plots surface throughout the story including Costa stealing a lawn gnome from a drug dealer and Thomas wanting to get with the hottest girl in school while juggling his true feelings for his long-time girl best friend, Kirby.

After worrying all night, Thomas eventually flips off a news helicopter from his roof and stops caring about the outrageous party downstairs. At that point, audience members should do the same: stop caring about characters and plot and savor the chaos.

You’re invited. Take your invitation and don’t worry about the little things—let loose and enjoy the party.

 


About the author  ⁄ tonymadonna